Mexico’s Narco Bailout

Dec 17th, 2008 | By Michel Marizco | Category: General News, Politics
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THE BORDER REPORT

From time to time, I like to give other people space to share their perspective on this border. Today, it’s a former drug trafficker for the Juárez Cartel, back from the days of Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

“Rabbit,” as he was known then and will be known on BorderReporter.com, worked for the Juárez Cartel from 1984 onward. He was charged, and I have copies of the U.S. District Court indictment and sentencing agreement that establish his credibility, with possession with intent to distribute more than one thousand kilograms of marijuana, money laundering and the Kingpin Rule, known as running a criminal enterprise.

Mexico’s $400 Million Tip

I recently saw on CNN that the United States Government gave the first $197 million of $400 million to Mexico to battle Mexico’s never-ending war with its very powerful narco cartels. I had to laugh. If you saw what I’ve seen, you would too.

In the mid-1980’s and the early 1990’s I worked for the Juárez Cartel. Everyone that I was involved with  worked for Amado Carillo-Fuentes, the Lord of the Skies. Amado had countless Federal Security Directorate and PGR agents working for him. I lived in a house in Hermosillo that AFI agents guarded 24 hours a day, that was loaded with several thousand kilos of cocaine. The most expensive home was called club Fed. These agents were paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to protect all of us. As long as the money flowed, we had the protection of the Mexican police.

Over the years, we paid off Mexican police, Mexican federales and military personnel. We also paid Border Patrol agents on this side of the border. I had involuntarily donated several several expensive vehicles to Mexican officials. If I drove down to Mexico in a nice vehicle, I was told how much they liked my ride. So I handed the keys over and that was the last time I saw my car. I got smart after a while and started driving down there in an old Pontiac Ventura. They wanted no part of that car.

Mexico could replace all the governors and all the upper level law enforcement heads along the border and still be plagued with corruption. The only success they would bring is bringing in a new band of thieves.

But let’s look at Sonora for a second.

At least 50 percent of all the U.S.’s narcotics are smuggled through Sonora. The U.S. governemnt confiscated 1.8 million pounds of pot on the Mexican border this year. They say that that reflects 15 percent of the gross product. So ask yourself how much space it takes to grow 10 million pounds of weed every year. Then ask yourself what $400 million pays for. We are not even talking about meth production or the thousands of acres of popies being grown there for the production of black tar heroin. Then you have the wide spread importation of cocaine from South America, 600 tons in 2007 alone.

The Amercan Government pays Mexico your tax dollars to combat a war that Mexican officials aren’t even trying to win. They don’t want to win. Maybe they can’t afford to win  The Mexican Army protects and is responsible for vast amounts of marijuana being grown in mexico for distribution in the U.S.   Back whe nI was in the business, the Mexican army acted as scouts for the traffickers in the Northern Sonoran area.

Along the border in places like Aqua Prieta and Naco, you have differnt narco traffickers that control that area. The Paredes-Machados family in Agua Prieta is one of these wealthy importers that are responsible for these areas. They have have used tunnels and the desert areas east of Douglas, Ariz., to import tons of marijuana and cocaine.

The Paredes have people out there monitoring the border 24 hours a day. They rarely lose any product.

My conclusion is that the United States just gave Mexico a $400 million donation. Whatever good that money can do, it will without a doubt be shadowed by the corruption that Mexico is known for. The problems down there are only beginning.

I haven’t been in the business for two years, but I can promise you, nothing has changed.

153 comments
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  1. http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/736827.html

    Updated news, Marcos Paredes was caught yesterday.

  2. wow now no one haas anything to say? & the only thing that makes me think when I read this is that it seems like a pissing contest!! & if Johnny is who I think you are then wow cuz the Paredes love their privacy & I know for a fact that they would be reall unhappy to read this if they get out! Which they will.. & yes everyone has the right to free speech but if you guys are so close then why even write all this? I don’t know but they gave lots of jobs & did do alot of good for AP.. So all I can say some of ur stories are right & some are way off! & public knowledge or not Rodolfo got cought in St. David! & that’s the truth!!!

  3. wow now no one has anything to say? & the only thing that makes me think when I read this is that it seems like a pissing contest!! & if Johnny is who I think you are then wow cuz the Paredes love their privacy & I know for a fact that they would be reall unhappy to read this if they get out! Which they will.. & yes everyone has the right to free speech but if you guys are so close then why even write all this? I don’t know but they gave lots of jobs & did do alot of good for AP.. So all I can say some of ur stories are right & some are way off! & public knowledge or not Rodolfo got cought in St. David! & that’s the truth!!!

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