When a 600-pound coke run nets you 2 years

Dec 8th, 2009 | By Michel Marizco | Category: General News, Politics
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THE BORDER REPORT

I wrote this story for the Nogales International yesterday but I’ll post it here because it’s dirty and I like it. You can read the full draft plea agreement below; it’s supposed to be filed this week in court.

The United States will agree to drop counts of drug trafficking and instead charge a former high-ranking U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent from Arizona with obstruction of justice, according to court documents filed last week and obtained by BorderReporter.com.

Richard Padilla Cramer, a Nogales, Ariz., native with 30 years in federal law enforcement, was arrested in September at his Green Valley home by Drug Enforcement Administration agents on trafficking and corruption charges. Padilla had initially pleaded not guilty, then entered into an agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and offered to change his plea last week. Court records show that the U.S. will ask for two years imprisonment and probation. Compare that to, say, this case, a Phoenix area man, sentenced to nine years in prison for letting a drug trafficker launder money through his landscaping company. PDF).

Initial charges out of Florida had accused Padilla Cramer of investing in a shipment of 660 pounds of cocaine that were supposed to be shipped from Panama to Spain. He was also accused of selling confidential federal law enforcement database information for as little as $2,000 when he worked as an ICE attaché in Guadalajara.

A draft of his plea agreement was filed last week and made available to a reporter. Monday morning, the U.S. Attorney’s in Florida said the change of plea hearing will not occur until Friday, Dec. 11.

According to the draft of the plea agreement, Padilla queried law enforcement databases for a pair of drug traffickers who wanted to see if they had any felony warrants filed against them.

In January 2006, Arturo Yidi Quintero, a money launderer, was in Florida, wanting to return to Mexico but afraid to do so because he didn’t know if he had a warrant for his arrest in that country. His associate, Nizar Issa David, was also being cautious. They were put in touch with Padilla Cramer in Guadalajara by other drug traffickers who told them they had an agent working within U.S. law enforcement.

Padilla accessed the DEA and ICE databases as well as the National Criminal Information System, searching for both names. Between January and March, he printed out the information, confirming neither man was wanted in Mexico.

Russell Koonin, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in South Florida, declined to comment on this story, but the draft of the plea agreement shows that Padilla Cramer will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice. Technically, the court can sentence him to twenty years in prison however federal prosecutors will ask for two, in exchange for the guilty plea.

Padilla Cramer headed the Nogales ICE office until 2004 when he transferred to Guadalajara. He retired in 2007 then went to work for Santa Cruz County Detention Center until his arrest.

According to the original criminal complaint filed against him, between March and June 2007, Padilla invested $15,000 to $25,000 in a 660-pound shipment of cocaine headed for Vigo, Spain, from Panama City, Panama. Five members of the cartel were arrested in Spain when the ship landed. Two months later, Padilla attended a meeting with drug traffickers who convinced him to retire from ICE and go to work for them.

In May 2009, he went to work for Santa Cruz County.

“I don’t suspect he would make any attempt to rejoin our department and obviously we would not be accepting an application from him,” said Santa Cruz County Sheriff Tony Estrada.

“This has been a big disappointment for his law enforcement family,” he said.

“Particularly disappointing.”

DRAFT OF THE PLEA AGREEMENT

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA

CASE NO. 09-20795-CR-HUCK(s)

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Plaintiff,

vs.

RICHARD PADILLA CRAMER,

Defendant.
/

PLEA AGREEMENT

The United States of America and RICHARD PADILLA CRAMER(hereinafter referred to as the “defendant”) enter into the following agreement:
The defendant agrees to plead guilty to a one count information, which charges the defendant with conspiracy to obstruct justice, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1512(c)(2), all in violation of  Title 18, United States Code, Section 1512(k).
The United States agrees to seek dismissal of the pending indictment in this case after sentencing.
The defendant is aware that the sentence will be imposed by the court after considering the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and Policy Statements (hereinafter “Sentencing Guidelines”).  The defendant acknowledges and understands that the court will compute an advisory sentence under the Sentencing Guidelines and that the applicable guidelines will be determined by the court relying in part on the results of a Pre-Sentence Investigation by the court’s probation office, which investigation will commence after the guilty plea has been entered.  The defendant is also aware that, under certain circumstances, the court may depart from the advisory sentencing guideline range that it has computed, and may raise or lower that advisory sentence under the Sentencing Guidelines.  The defendant is further aware and understands that the court is required to consider the advisory guideline range determined under the Sentencing Guidelines, but is not bound to impose that sentence; the court is permitted to tailor the ultimate sentence in light of other statutory concerns, and such sentence may be either more severe or less severe than the Sentencing Guidelines’ advisory sentence.  Knowing these facts, the defendant understands and acknowledges that the court has the authority to impose any sentence within and up to the statutory maximum authorized by law for the offense identified in paragraph 1 and that the defendant may not withdraw the plea solely as a result of the sentence imposed.
The defendant also understands and acknowledges that the court may impose a statutory maximum term of up to 20 years imprisonment, followed by a term of supervised release of up to three years.  In addition to a term of imprisonment and supervised release, the court may impose a fine of up to $250,000.
The defendant further understand and acknowledges that, in addition to any sentence imposed under paragraph 4 of this agreement, a special assessment in the amount of $100.00 will be imposed on the defendant.  The defendant agrees that any special assessment imposed shall be paid at the time of sentencing.
The Office of the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida (hereinafter “Office”) reserves the right to inform the court and the probation office of all facts pertinent to the sentencing process, including all relevant information concerning the offenses committed, whether charged or not, as well as concerning the defendant and the defendant’s background.  Subject only to the express terms of any agreed-upon sentencing recommendations contained in this agreement, this Office further reserves the right to make any recommendation as to the quality and quantity of punishment.
The United States agrees that it will recommend at sentencing that the Court reduce by two levels  the sentencing guideline level applicable to the defendant’s offense, pursuant to Section 3E1.1(a) of the Sentencing Guidelines, based upon the defendant’s recognition and affirmative and timely acceptance of personal responsibility, and a decrease of one additional level pursuant to U.S.S.G. Section 3E1.1(b), if prior to any reduction under Section 3E1.1(a) the defendant’s offense level is 16 or higher.  However, the United States will not be required to make this sentencing recommendation if the defendant: (1) fails or refuses to make a full, accurate and complete disclosure to the probation office and this Office of the circumstances surrounding the relevant offense conduct; (2) is found to have misrepresented facts to the government prior to entering this plea agreement; or (3) commits any misconduct after entering into this plea agreement, including but not limited to committing a state or federal offense, violating any term of release, or making a false statement or misrepresentation to any governmental entity or official.
The defendant is aware that the sentence has not yet been determined by the Court.  The defendant also is aware that any estimate of the probable sentencing range or sentence that the defendant may receive, whether that estimate comes from the defendant’s attorney, the government, or the probation office, is a prediction, not a promise, and is not binding on the government, the probation office or the Court. The defendant  understands further that any recommendation that the government makes to the Court as to sentencing, whether pursuant to this agreement or otherwise, is not binding on the Court and the Court may disregard the recommendation in its entirety.  The defendant understands and acknowledges that the defendant may not withdraw his plea based upon the Court’s decision not to accept a sentencing recommendation made by the defendant, the government, or a recommendation  jointly made by both the defendant and the government.
The United States and the defendant agree that, although not binding on the probation office or the Court, they will jointly recommend that the Court make the following findings and conclusions as to the sentence to be imposed:
Base offense level: That the base offense level be 14, pursuant to U.S.S.G. Section 2J1.2(a).  The United States further agrees not to seek to have the offense level increased based on any underlying offense under Section 2J1.2(c)(1).
Abuse of position of trust: That the offense level be increased by two levels for the abuse of a position of trust in the commission of the offense, pursuant to U.S.S.G. Section 3B1.3.    c.  Obstruction of Justice: That pursuant to U.S.S.G. Section 3C1.1, the defendant’s offense level should be increased two levels for obstruction of justice in connection with his post-arrest interview with the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), during which he provided misleading information which impeded OIG’s investigation of the offense set forth in Paragraph One of this Agreement.
d.  That the total adjusted offense level is 15 and that the sentence should be 24 months imprisonment.
The defendant is aware that Title 18, United States Code, Section 3742 affords the defendant the right to appeal the sentence imposed in this case.  Acknowledging this, in exchange for the undertakings made by the United States in this plea agreement, the defendant hereby waives all rights conferred by Section 3742 to appeal any sentence imposed, including any restitution order, or to appeal the manner in which the sentence was imposed, unless the sentence exceeds the maximum permitted by statute or is the result of an upward departure or variance from the guideline range that the Court establishes at sentencing.  The defendant further understands that nothing in this agreement shall affect the government’s right and/or duty to appeal as set forth in Title 18, United States Code, Section 3742(b).  However, if the United States appeals the defendant’s sentence pursuant to Section 3742(b), the defendant shall be released from the above waiver of appellate rights. By signing this agreement, the defendant acknowledges that he has discussed the appeal waiver set forth in this agreement with his attorney.  The defendant further agrees, together with the United States, to request that the district Court enter a specific finding that the defendant’s waiver of his right to appeal the sentence to be imposed in this case was knowing and voluntary.
16    This is the entire agreement and understanding between the United States and the defendant.  There are no other agreements, promises, representations, or understandings.
JEFFREY H. SLOMAN
ACTING UNITED STATES ATTORNEY

Date:                                       By:
RICHARD E. GETCHELL
ASSISTANT UNITED STATES ATTORNEY

Date:                                      By:
HECTOR L. FLORES, ESQ.
ATTORNEY FOR DEFENDANT

Date:                                        By:
RICHARD PADILLA CRAMER
DEFENDANT

53 comments
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  1. BULLSHIT!!!!!!!!!!

    Ive know other people who have smuggled less and get more time than this daisySUCKER!!!

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  2. The corruption on both sides of the border is beyond the comprehension of most people. The only people that get off easy are the ones that have the goods on some “organisation.” Anyone remember Carlos Tehran, Mike Morales, Don Simpson? Don Simpson was a customes agent for a long time. In 1989 his car got picked off in Casa Grande with over 100 kilos in the trunk. Louis Arcenega was driving that car. To make a long story short, Don Simpson got like 30 years. While several people lost their lives over a missing 400 kilo load of coke. (Stolen by Louis son Frankie) It’s only gonna get better folks.

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  3. my friend “Gordo” from mexicali (he’s a u.s citizen) spent 2 and a half years for 50 pounds of weed, Mr Cramer got lucky, or the laws are changing drastically.

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  4. Ni modo dijo el Gordo. That job is to be left to non U.S Citizens/Residents , 500 lbs or less of weed remember, if you’re not a U.S citizen or resident and you’re caught at the border tying to smuggle 500lbs or less of mota you will not be prosecuted, just detained for a couple of hours, pinches leyes.

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  5. make them 250 of coke and i’m so there, only a couple of hours at the federal hotel for a load like that would be great, lol!!!…ta amár.

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  6. Who says the drug war is not being fought on US soil?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/09/us/09border.html?_r=1&hp

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  7. Remeber, U.S. drug laws were designed to give the bigger fish a “get out of jail free” card. Educate yourselves. Read Rule 5. k (1). That rule lets anyone with juicy info walk free. Dangerous men, like Sammy (The Bull) Gravano, not to mention thousands of drug trafficers, have gained their freedom because of it, Ernesto Ruben Chavez walked free as a bird over it. fooken Ratts!!!!! The rest of us do long prison terms because of these disgusting rules!!!

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  8. Then become a big fish…

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  9. The game has gotten so dirty that trying to be a big fish on the American side is a loser. Walking around with a bullseye on your back sucks ass. Lost too many friends and family to this bullshit drug war. The game is for people that are not educated. When I was young, I thought I my shit didn’t stink. Now, my shit stinks worse than anyone. I know better!!!!!

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  10. aint NO friends in the game Rabit……… money fuels jealously and ambition for the next guy that wants to be on top. Just become The Bank……

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  11. I feel you drift, I just keep to myself. I walked away my knowledge, I feel blessed to know the things I know. Feel fortunate to have seen what I’ve seen. But what I call haters, are out there in this world. When you are on top, everyone wants to be in your shoes, until the ax falls. Then all the blame goes to the guy on top. Shitty game for people who have no honor. Remeber, no honor among thieves. That stands strong.

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  12. Michael should help me write a book. “Dirty Sonora.”

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  13. Rabbit, now I remember who you are, can I ask then how come there are guys that we’ve never heard of, and probably never will, how come they get away with it, meaning no one even knows who they are? Is it because they’re smart, or because they are surrounded by people that actually live by a code?
    Also too, I was asked by a friend, can you answer this…the DEA is saying prices haven’t droped from narcotics, a standard rate to show the boys on the hill that they are aking a dent in the drug trade. This shows they are not, and we all know the US aint stopping shit, but during the 07’s and part of 08’s there was a drop, contributed to the war among the cartels. If prices have gone back to standard rates you assume that they’re getting the same amount through. So why the hell are we still sheding blood in Juarez and Sinaloa if it aint over turf?

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  14. US Attorneys can’t litigate in open court, or are terrified to. That’s why defendants with federal drug charges get sweet plea deals despite overwhelming evidence. State charges get you more time because county attorneys are apparently slightly more interested in justice than their winning percentage. This was NOT going to be an easy case to win, despite the headlines. Remember, the guy INVESTED in the drug deal. He wasn’t caught red handed neck deep in coke.

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  15. Look, don’t be confused bu the hype, folks. The DEA says whatever suits them. Street prices have been affected by the ongoing turf war between the “famalies”. Prices are higher. Coke is five or six grand higher per kilo. Marijuana has jumped 100 bucks a pound. These are significant price hikes. There is no winners in this situation. El Chapo and El Mayo are in control. Anyone that works with these fellas is the boss. Tantos, I hope you don’t believe the comment you left. Misguided words. Everything is a deal, one way or another. The County attorneys make more deals than anyone. It’s all information gathering. The Feds just don’t want small timers. The State prosecutes anyone.

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  16. Don’t kid youself. They hear about everyone, eventually. There is no honor among thieves. One minute theuy are your friend, the next minute they are wackintg you or ratting on you. No one is opperating across that border that they don’t know about. I mean Leo and Marco Paredes moved hundreds of millions of dolars throughArizonas border, the whole time under indictment from more than one case. Leo was murdered by Dos Mil at a restruant less than a half mile accross the border. If they wanted them, no one could tell. It’s a game. A dirty game. I have so much dirt on people. I mean, if you believe the government, you need to just kill yourself, no disrespect intended. They lie like hell. They are not trying to win this war. It’s all about jobs and money. Ever ask yourself what would happen if there was no black market? Are econoy would crash. That money sustains life on both sides of the law. Drug money is spent on goods that keep our businesses running. The prisons and the courts stay busy employing thousand of workers. What would they do if there was no drug laws? 70% of the cops, judges, prison guards, clerks, attorneys would all be out of work. Smarten up people. It’s a dirty game, all the4 way around.

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  17. I agree with Rabit my line of work took a big ass hit cuz these fools are not letting independent car saleman sell vehicles without getting hit up for vehicles or cash then they kidnap someone who was a wholesaler get the ransom paid and they still take him out, the guy sold to everyone and a lot of people were buying but with this stupid ass war and the border tightening up everything on border crossing these guys are just going after anyone showing a little flash

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  18. Drift, not everyone gets to see what you see. You are exactly right. I hope people are educating themselves. When I first contacted michael, all I wanted to do is educate people and give a voice to truth. I always knew some people are so hard headed to listen to fact. However, I will continue to speak. Anyone that reads what I write, please try to be open minded to a person who has seen first hand what has turned into a disgusting game. I want my voice heard, even though it puts my family and friends, not to mention myself, in jeopardy. I thank mike m. For giving me a voice.

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  19. http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkmhLqiBLigkAPixXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzdmRxYTcyBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0Y4NjBfMTE4/SIG=11i6bqq50/EXP=1260518347/**http%3a//elperiodicodeap.com.mx/
    check it out narco mantas en agua prieta

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  20. here is a beeter link to the narcomantas in Agua Prieta

    http://www.radiotrece.com.mx/2009/12/09/aparecen-narcomantas-en-sonora/

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  21. Rabbit, do you really believe that 70% of the criminal justice workforce would be “out of work” if most drugs were legalized? To buy that, you’d have to believe that all the criminal dealers, smugglers, enforcers, and assassins would suddenly have a ” Come to Jesus” moment, and become gainfully employed. Not a chance. They would just shift to another criminal enterprise. For some reason, there is a popular fairy tale belief that prisons are full of inmates doing 10 years cuz they got caught one time with a pound of weed. It’s simply not true. 99% of the time people who do time for drug offenses have a VERY lengthy, diverse, and often violent arrest history.

    You are correct that the feds only want to prosecute big cases (Mario mentioned the weight threshold), but most US attorneys really do suck at litigating compared to the locals. But maybe you aren’t aware that certain (and very lucrative) private sector jobs dry up for AUSA’s who have less than a 100% winning percentage. How does a prosecutor avoid losses? Only accept slam dunk cases for prosecution, and then plea them all out.

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  22. Tantos, you must be a cop. I have done 15 years of my life in prison for smuggling. I have never been a predetor. If the drug war went away, it run the organized crime element out of it. The prices would drop, more than half the prisons are drug offenders. You are not communicating with some punk assed, pretending lame. I am very real. And what you say defies real sense. The prisons are full of non violent drug offenders. My father died in prison. You don’t have your facts strait. But explaining suply and demand to some one so closed minded, defies logic to me. Take care and stop misleading people. I question your motives. You construed what I. Said, and that puts you in a bad light. All readers, excuse this poor, ignorant s.o.b.

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  23. Rabbit, I would like to communicate with you personally, I want to run something by you.

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  24. The states prosecute anyone. The states threshhold is 4 pounds, mandatory prison. And what you fail to elaborate on is that the drug money fuels the violence. What possible thing that is ileagal in mexico that would produce the financing and chaos that is transpiring right now? Ileagal immigration? Pull your head out dude? No one would give a shit if there wasn’t so much money in drug trafficing. The politics of the war on drugs feeds itself on both sides of the law. They can’t afford to stop it, that simple. Propaganda won’t ever change it. The jobs and revenue that the drug war creats justifys itself. To pretend otherwise is foolish, but then again you obviously have not seen what I’ve seen, even if you did you would probably come up with some nonsense to try to make other close minded people stand up and scream “amen brother.” Thank god!

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  25. Girlfriend, contact michael. I would consider talking. But I avoid being put in bad situations. So think carefully before you venture down that path

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  26. Esmerelda, what can I do for you? Create an e mail and post it. I’ll contact you.

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  27. Sorry for offending anyone, you readers are appreciated. Good night.

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  28. He’s a border patrol agent I think, that or he works for the Union that protects the border patrol agents, I battled it out with the guy one time over something, you can’t argue with ignorance or an ignorant person, don’t waste your time on him.
    Besides, watch one episode of “Cops” pick any episode and his argument is right out the window. They pull someone over for “eradic driving” all of a sudden they’re asking to search the car “if you got nothing to hide let me search the car” one of those moves, they con the sucker into letting his car get searched and they find one tiny drop of a drug, boom, there you go now the stat’s get bumped up. Take that to city coucil, bam, need more cops and so on and so on. Tantos, you better pray they don’t leagilize drugs, you and all your pals are ass out on the street looking for jobs at Ross as a Theft Loss Prevention Agent, and you can kiss your $20 an hour or whatever unreasonable rate you’re getting paid right now right out the door.
    And now I’m fooking pissed off, now you got me fooking furious, do you all realize that the DOD loaned out some Predator Drones to the CBP to use, these things can count the freckles on your face from 30,000 feet in the air, one would think it was a great idea to try these out, but the head of the CBP union thinks that this could be a bad idea, why? Because these things can do the job of a hundred agents, that means less due’s to the union, that means less hires, that means your fooked out of a job. Meanwhile Joe Taxpayer gets no say in this project that at the end of the day can’t get bribed, can’t NOT cover area’s human’s can, and ohhh, did I fail to mention saves hundreds of thousands of dollars. What’s pathetic is you don’t even realize you are part of the corruption machine that allows this to happen.

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  29. wasn’t he on the forum around a year ago, he was arguing it out with a mother who was looking for her son that was missing in Juarez? An american guy.

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  30. Some of you are wise and awesome!!!! Vincent Hanna, I got your back!!!!! Amen!!!! Amen!!!!!

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  31. No, he says he is Mexican American, ha! Whatever the fook that means.

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  32. This story struck a chord with me. Border report is great forum for all of us to speak out. I appologise to michael for speaking out so harshley. However, some times reality is harsh. This story is prime example of our governments apathetic actions… I have lived a hard life. Bones rattle in my closet from the time I wake til the time is sleep. I just want to share my dirty world with all of you that don’t get to see it. Thanks for the support from those of you that have great open minds. No disrespect intended. To any of you that appreciate my words, understand that a life time of dirty laundry has made me cynical as hell. We have a dirty government. And the traffickers are just helping to fund the filthiest business in the world. I wonder what freeway rick ross would be saying right now, or Caro Quintero? Well, are not here……… but I am. God bless!

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  33. Response from Arturo Beltran Narcomantas. If you recall the ones in agua prieta left by gente nueva.
    http://www.debate.com.mx/eldebate/Articulos/ArticuloGeneral.asp?IdArt=9250914&IdCat=6087

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  34. You guys see the slaughtered bodies in Guerrero.. the message read.. “”Manden gente mas capacitada putos sinaloenses y michoacanos, vengan a recoger su petunia basura” Atte. El jefe de jefes.” … i wish i can post the pics here

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  35. If anyone knows who the 2 people hit in aqua prieta yesterday, let me know. I have conflicting stories.

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  36. they were one step to arrest edgar valdez in cuernavaca, he got away.

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  37. Getting ugly. Well. Pot season is in full swing. Everyone is fighting over money. Sucks!

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  38. http://lapolaka.com/2009/12/12/reportero-juarense-pide-asilo/

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  39. A good Kentucky friend tells me that MJ is now the biggest cash crop there, replacing tobacco. And when I posted information that on another site, several other residents of that state confirmed that.

    I wonder how its distribution “fits” with the distribution of the MX Cartels? Is the Kentucky weed sold only locally?

    (Note to Rabbit: your observations are the most comprehensive, candid, and insightful I’ve ever read. Keep them coming: what you write shines a light on what I see going on here in my barrio near the border. Corruption abounding!)

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  40. Louisville KY to Nashville TN are booming hubs. I-65 is a hotbed of traffiking

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  41. Thanks, Jack. I apreciate the support. I try to share fact. The drug war has eroded our rights in this country. Our constitution has suffered bad. Our right to privacy does not exhist anymore. Patriot act? Goegrge Busch and his people were a tragedy for the people of this country. However, don’t. Anyone. Believe that the they want to stop drug traffickers. Most of what everyone sees is control of a covert planning. Drug money has funded some of the biggest opperations in thee world. Freeway Ricky Ross is a prime example of what drug money is being used for. Everyone one uderstand, the drug war, like so many other government lies, isn’t trying to be won. It keeps a lot of people employed on both sides of the law, and fuels covert opporations. The politics of all of it is dirty. The next time you see a police officer search a car on the side of a road, look in the mirror and feel sorry for yourself for believing our government. I want people to wake up. That is why I post these words. Hopefully my words will impact some of you.

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  42. This just shows you that the US Governent Justice System can be paid off! There is no way in hell that this pig is getting off with a slap on the hand. As a retired Federal LEO it makes me sick to just even think of him as being one of us at one time.

    I don’t know what to say about the candy ass government lawyers who made the deal. The US Attorney should look into this unless, he is part of the pay off as well.

    Just Sick……….

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  43. Hey Vincent Hanna, who made you the hall monitor of this site? Sorry I got you all fired up. I hope you were able to calm down after changing your bong water. Try to not read too much into everything. Not everything is a conspiracy when government or law enforcement make stupid decisions. I think you sometimes confuse ineptitude or laziness with corruption.

    Rabbit, you’ve got an axe to grind because you got caught and did serious time. I get it, and I’m not offended. I’ve read thousands of rap sheets (criminal history reports). That’s part of what I base my opinion on. I still haven’t seen any solid information that legalizing certain outlawed drugs would have the effect that you state would be a certainty. I think weed should be legalized, or at least decriminalized. I just doubt that it would have the dramatic effect you hope for. Some “experts” back in the day thought that overturning the alcohol prohibition would cripple organized crime, because bootlegging was their biggest source of income. Well, it didn’t work. The Mafia families in America actually enjoyed the heighth of their power in the 1960’s and 1970’s, decades after Prohibition ended.

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  44. Tantos, I didn’t get caught. I was ratted on by government stooge. I understand that you are on the law enforcement end. And I’m not mad at you for that. And I never said that if you decriminalise mota that it would all go away. I said that it is a filthy game on both sides of the law. (undispetuniable) I am telling you for a fact, that the war on drugs is a farce. I’m telling you for a fact that they are making drug barons richer than hell. El chapo is on the fooken forbes list of billionares. What ever the governemnt is doing isn’t working. for seriouse change to happen, they need to start all over, which will never happen, it would put needle dicks like you out of work. I am not grinding an ax. I am educating people. Unlike you, I care. I’ve seen the devistation on families. I’ve lost friends and family. To put it simple, you are what is wrong with the system. Your mentality isn’t about compassion for people. I am different than you, and proud of it. I am trying to do right in a world of wrongs. I am cleaning out my closet. That is what makes feel better about myself. But then again, you are not me. (I’m glad for that) (comunist)

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  45. After thinking about a lot of what Tantos wrote, I feel obligated to say one more thing. First, I have a lot of knowledge about things you commented on. Guess what? I am fromm the east coast. My family were bootleggers two generations back. However, they were loan sharks, Gamblers, into construction rackets. So Bootleggeing wasn’t their only source of income. It worked while it worked, but they all just continued with their other activities after it ended. You are comparing apples and oranges. The mexican cartels primary function is narco trafficking. The reason there is so much money in it is because of the demand on this side of the border. And, the proffits increased because of the ridiculouse drug laws. The violence in mexico is directly attributed to this. Decriminalising marijuana wont do shit except drive the prices of meth, coke and heroen higher than they already are. Open your mind up. Do something in your community that will change the mindset of people like you. Quite frankly, YOU and people like YOU are part of the problem. Your mentality hasn’t worked for the last 30+ years. It has enriched some very dangerouse people, and has hurt a lot of families. I could go on for days about why it isn’t working. However, rather than do that. I would rather just keep trying to educate people, hoping that my message gets out there. I hope someday you open your mind and realise that people like me are people too. My blood is red, and my thoughts and feelings are genuine. I am not grinding an axe. And I definately don’t need no more skeletons in my closet. I don’t claim to be an angel. (Far from it) But the drug game is a dirty game on both sides of the law, the way it stands. I hope you realise it and do something yourself to push change, instead of turning positive words into negative ones. Someday I wish I could push my whole story in depth to the whole world. Until then, I wish all of you well.

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  46. He needs to watch his back for those two years. I bet that he had some good information about the cartels and that is what got him only two years. But, once in prison the cartels will put a hit on him.

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  47. Rabbit, first of all, I want to thank you for touching on the human element, and reinforing the fact that humans, no matter what situation they may find themselves in, are usually equipped with the same set of feelings and emotions as the next. Recently, a couple close family friends were caught up in a marijuana bust in the east coast. A local newspaper reported the arrest and comments began flooding in: “they deserved what they got,” “Kudos to the police” and “I hope they enjoy their x-mas presents.” While humorous to some, it hurt those close to the people involved because we are talking about the most kindhearted, giving people I know. There is a sense of helplessness involved at both ends, because it seems as though one is actually presumed guilty and must prove their innocence. It also sucks, because during the arrest, several of their rights were violated and we learned that a known drug dealer, in collaboration with law enforcement, was the masterminder of this literal “death trap.” I can speak of several similar stories where REPEAT VIOLENT offenders are allowed numerous “get out of jail cards” after contacting law enforcement “enablers” (for lack of a better word); usually after getting busted for a crime outside of their informant contracts. Obviously, these people do not represent the 99% of repeat drug offenders in prison, because they are permitted to flaunt around like stockbrokers on Wall Street. I am sorry I got off on tangents, but I truly want to thank you for sharing your thoughts and knowledge. I too share an interest in this culture that has evolved. As you suggested, lives have been ruined, are being ruined and will continued to be ruined by this lame war on drugs and all its hypocritcal elements! Good job and hope you had a blessed holiday.

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  48. I feel for you. There are so many tragedies in the drug game. Right before Christmas 1988 I had a big wonderful family. It all changed in one day. Drug charges, murder and lots of monitary loss. The media takes cheap shots at people while they are down. Like you said, your family are kind hearted and giving people, but that will be over shadowed by self serving fooks. Your family will find out that friends are few and that there is no honor among thieves. Whoever you are, be supportive of your people. In the end that is all they will have, but it will mean a lot. The east coast is different than the desert southwest. Real dirty world in Arizona. But your family will have a lot f regrets in the end. Stand by them and show them support, they will need it. I call it the begining of the end. Good luck.

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  49. Rabbit, you have proven to be 100% correct, it’s basically come down to several people washing their hands of the family members, and saying “it’s your problem.” In regards to your situation, it sounds right out of a movie, with a horrible ending. There have been a few stories where injustice was served, BS indictments were handed down, and a couple of people really close to me are dealing with this crazy BS as I write. Their story is unbelievable, and the culprit is even more unbelievable. I wish I could discuss the situation, but the case is still going through the court process. Ultimately, lives have been turned upside down across the board. Anyways, thanks for responding and reconfirming what we were already starting to observe. Take care and thanks for the well-wishes!

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  50. My heart goes out to you. I wish I could explain how some things went down with me and my family. The culprit is always someone who knew too much. Eventually, it makes you cynical. My father said to me before he died, “if you can count your true friends on one hand before you die, you are a very lucky man.” As I get older, the meaning of that makes more and more sense. Tell your people to keep their heads up. not to lose sight of the people that they are. Tell them to hang on to their pride and dignity. They will have a lot of regret when it’s all over. Be a graet friend and be supportive. Sometimes that means just being a good ear for someone to vent to. I wish you and them really well.

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  51. el conehito esta buscando gente para chihuahuar el y su familia erran ratones

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  52. Hey, you are a rat. Back your words with some fact. So I can make you look like a liar.

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  53. I am a first timer to post. I just want to say I really feel the words Rabbit has to say. Kudos to you for taking this stand. There is a lot of corruption within politics and law enforcement…I know first hand and am living the nghtmare as we speak.

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