“A Veces el Cielo Niega La Lluvia”

Apr 7th, 2010 | By Michel Marizco | Category: General News, Organized Crime, Politics
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THE BORDER REPORT

He looks damned good for 62 years old; chesty, thick working man arms, that haughty look, the upturned chin. Life must be pretty good for a man supposedly on the run. Pablo Escobar was burning piles of money to keep warm; he was over-weight, out-of-shape, paranoid and thoroughly spooked when he went down. Ismael El Mayo Zambada? Not so much.

By now I’ve had a chance to re-read Mayo’s interview a few times, I’m sure you have, too. He reveals little; or rather, the interview reveals little. He denies that Joaquín El Chapo Guzmán ever married that beauty queen. He denies the importance of Chapo’s placement on Forbes’ list of billionaires. He even denies that he himself is a drug lord, let alone one of Mexico’s most powerful. The old man’s been running circles around the Justice Department since the Reagan Administration, after all. There is little in terms of the braggadocio you might expect from a man of his stature in the world of organized crime. Instead, he claims he is a cattle rancher and a farmer but if he can open a business in the United States, he’d like to do so (that can also be interpreted as if he can open a “negotiation with” the United States, he’d like to do so … ) Oh, and the war on drugs is lost.

In fact, his interview with Proceso Magazine’s Julio Scherer reads much like the interviews conducted with Eduardo Arellano Felix in 2002 (“No ganaron. Estoy aquí, y nada ha cambiado,”), Sandra Avíla Beltrán in 2009 (“La violencia está en el propio Gobierno.” also with Scherer, now that I think about it) and the wife of Vicente Carrillo Leyva, Celia Karina, (Yo digo que el Gobierno debería agarrar a las personas que realmente hacen cosas. Pero agarrar inocentes para decir que están trabajando en el narcotráfico) eso es una injusticia.) Also with Proceso.

The only question I have is why now? Mayo approached Proceso with the interview offer, because, he says, he’s always wanted to meet Scherer. And it’s been taken up on this site and in many Mexican media, that this was an individual decision perhaps done so for personal reasons. Because his son is in prison, maybe because he’s sick, maybe just old and tired and his perspective has changed. I disagree.

Mayo Zambada is part of a syndicate, he is not a lone operator. This is not El Viceroy Vicente Carrillo or Fernando Sanchez Arellano. This is a senior member of a powerful cartel protected, whether through neglect or complicity, by the government of Mexico. Mayo Zambada did not wake up one day in February and decide he wanted to meet Julio Scherer. This was calculated, the question is, by whom? The Sinaloa Federation or the Mexican government?

Start with the publication. Proceso has become an odd little magazine over the years. Started in 1976, the magazine had a near-vendetta for the PAN political party, attacking Pres. Vicente Fox Quesada nearly every chance they had. They invented quotes putting Fox in a negative light; went after Marta Sahagún, Fox’s wife, and publicly declared that her son was meeting with representatives of Joaquín El Chapo Guzmán.

Then in 2008, they went after Sonora Gov. Eduardo Bours Castelo. I’ll never forget that particular story for this sentence (recall that Bours’ family owns Bachoco, the largest poultry company in Mexico):

“Y avicultores de Ciudad Obregón y de Hermosillo comentan al reportero que la empresa Bachoco opera, con licencias oficiales, la importación de efedrina. Esta sustancia –comúnmente utilizada para la elaboración de medicamentos (entre ellos los antigripales) y por cuyo manejo discrecional saltó a la fama el empresario chino Zhenli Ye Gon– sirve para mezclarla con el alimento que consumen los pollos criados por Bachoco. El consumo de efedrina permite que los pollos no duerman en un lapso de al menos ocho semanas. De esa manera, el pollito ‘se la pasa comiendo de día y de noche’, según relata a Proceso un empresario avícola.”

Translation: Growers from Obregón and Hermosillo tell the reporter that Bachoco conducts, under official license, the importation of ephedrine. This substance, commonly produced for cold medicine – and other discretionary uses like that leading to the fame of Zhenli Ye Gon – is also served in the food consumed by the poultry grown by Bachoco. The consumption ensures that the chickens don’t sleep for at least eight weeks. In this manner, ‘the fowl keeps eating day and night … “

What do Bours and Fox have in common? Or rather, what did they have in common? Bours served as the governor’s representative to the Security Committee; the committee that in 2005, agreed to Operation México Seguro. Remember that one? That’s the federal operation that started the militarization fiasco now over-taking Juárez, Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon.

In 2006, Bours backed Felipe Calderón for the presidency, pulling away from his own party, the PRI. His backing, one of only three PRI governors to do so, but also one of the most powerful, ensured Calderón’s victory against Andres Lopez Obradór in an otherwise very tight election.

And now El Mayo surfaces.

I can nearly understand why he would be chosen as the consiglierie. Historically, he’s been the calmest of the crowd; he’s no Chapo, he was only tangentially connected to the Guadalajara Cartel blamed for the murder of the DEA agent in the 1980s. He’s never done anything outlandish like introduce the Zetas into the political theater of Mexico’s narcotics business. He’s as good a diplomat as the Mexican cartel figures could hope for.

In many ways, and it’s been pointed out by readers of this site already, he’s also a good front-man for a certain character sketch of Mexican drug lords. Humble, independent, rugged; born of the Sierra, with his wife and his daughters, and he cries for his incarcerated son and drops beautiful quotes about the freedom offered by the heavens.

Very much a public relations move. But was it one conducted by the Sinaloa Federation or the government of Mexico?

And that is the question we should be asking.

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138 comments
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  1. Wow, Marizco! You couldn’t even name “the DEA agent?”

    fooking, WOW!!

    You’ve guys got your heads so far up these bastards’ asses it’s incredible, appauling, and a low down dirty shame to say the least!!

    How do you even type so efficiently with one hand on the keyboard and the other around Mayo’s daisy!?!

    For those of you who remain with the slightest sense of dignity, and would like to read up on who “the DEA agent” was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Camarena

    Tortured and killed at 37 years of age. TORTURED and KILLED.

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  2. EnPokasPalabras April 7th, 2010 4:54 am
    That’s Zambada… a little worked (cosmetic surgery)… but it’s him.. Zambada is a mastermind. He created (or rather exposed) his image as a humble, rancher styled character. An image that has nothing to do with your stereotypical mob-boss; flaunting jewelry, fancy clothes cars and mansions. Notice his simple attire. Also notice the background. Dirt and brush. Not a single sign of a lavish lifestyle (not that he doesn’t live it or occasionaly does so). A perfect picture of a simple man, saying how he cries for his son, and dreads the idea of being incarcerated. Something that makes him seem more humanly related with the rest of the population. Also notice how the reporter describes what they ate. That was purposely written, and subconsciously meant to describe him as a “frijolitos over lobster” elector. What will that do? It quells peoples’ fearful distorted image of the Sinaloa Cartel, as opossed to the Zetas (Sinaloa Cartels’ #1 Enemy). The Sinaloa Cartel is respected by the “governments’ true government” to a certain extent, due to it’s more than 40 years in existence (a kind of seniority?) A big plus for the Sinaloa Cartel, is that the Zetas (whom many claim the Mexican Government is really after in Mexicos’ drug war”) were founded by (as we all know) defecting elite Mexican soldiers, which was a direct slap to Mexicos’ Federal Government.

    Call it whatever you want to call it… I cal it “narcopolitical”… ; )

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  3. Camerena was playing both sides of the fence, idiot. You talk a lot of shit. That’s old news. Go troll somewhere else.

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  4. If I were Eduardo Bours, I would just pay Michel off, b/c he ain’t never going to stop!!!!

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  5. Rabbit: How was Camarena playing both sides of the fense? Is there any viable or feasible evidence left of this?

    I’m just asking, because everything I’ve read in relation to Camaerna, is mostly fromt he Dept. of Justice’s point of you – they made him out to be a martyr. I’m highly interested in a different angle, especially the one you just brought up.

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  6. @ Isabella

    Well, I’m not gonna bash a dead man too much. But I was deep off in the mix in those days. There were a lot of mixed rumors on the deal, but from a reliable source, He was meddling way too much. Not just from a legal point of view. They didn’t just target him and pick him off the street. I’m not saying what Quintero did was smart, but they thought it easier to kill the outsider, rather than pay him any more. (really stupid) But as you see, he has never been extradited to the U.S. Real political deal that was. That’s all I will say.

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  7. @ Vincent Hanna

    That dude has way too much to hide. He should pay someone. He has the money.

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  8. IS THERE ANY VIABLE OR FEASIBLE EVIDENCE SHUT UP !! ALWAYS TRYIMG TO BELITTLE PEOPLE
    GO TO YOUR fookING STARBUCKS AND DROWN ON YOUR LATTE

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  9. pa la pura neta, si el hombre no escribio el nombre de KiKi, es porque sabe que todos aqui sabemos de sobra quien es, como murio, y algunos tambien sabemos porque murio, es como si fuera necesario escribir el nombre del jefe del cartel del golfo y creador de los zetas, o al narco Colombiano mas poderoso que a visto el mundo, aqui todos sabemos de quien se trata, y al parecer es otro quien tiene la cabeza bien atascada en el nomeniegues, ese guey fue asesinado porque queria agarrarle la pierna al que le ofrecia una mano, y al final de cuentas quedo como un heroe aqui en el gabacho.

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  10. Rabbit: So basically, since he was a DEA agent, the Dept. of Justice used him as an excuse to “extradite,” or yank them (the men that were allegedly involved) out of their countries. There’s one particular case I’m interested in.

    Back to El Mayo’s interview, “This is a senior member of a powerful cartel protected, whether through neglect or complicity, by the government of Mexico.”

    If El Mayo is protected by the Mexican government (be it complicity or neglect), why is his son sitting in a federal holding facility in Chicago, while he awaits his trial?

    If he is protected by the Mexican government, what happened?

    Because taking Vicente into custudy is the same as taking El Mayo, it’s not a close friend we’re discussing here, it’s his flesh and blood.

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  11. El Mayo puts his pants on one leg at a time, just like you and I.

    @ elcardian-
    she can’t help it, she never shut’s up, the only thing she is good for is so that I can get to 100 faster now because she rambles on and on and on.

    @ Rabbit-
    I do believe it’s around that time of year where Mikey does the anniversary story on Fredo, and Bours’ name always floats around that subject.

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  12. @ Rabbit

    Pendejo, he was playing “both sides of the fence” because that’s what you do when you infiltrate a criminal organization.

    I do, in fact, talk alot of “shit.” But it’s “La Pura Neta!”

    Conejo Pendejo!!

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  13. Ahora, que facil se quitaron las mascaras los chotas.

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  14. @ ilegal

    Pinchi Mojado, obviamente no capturaste al 100 el mensaje dentro de mi mensaje!!
    Gracias por reiterar lo obvio, Cara De Culo!! El 99% de los que visitan este sitio entienden de lo que se habla!!

    Mi pedo es la manera en que tan delicadamente se refieren a estos seres macabros!! Un periodico no explica las noticias en el tono que se utiliza en este sitio!! Un periodo da los detalles, a veces incorrectos, pero raramente platican de estas personas cual si estuvieran escribiendo un corrido!!

    Usa el cerebro, Pinchi Ilegal!! Por eso estamos como estamos!!!

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  15. Count me as another person that understood that he was talking about Kiki right away.

    There were always rumors that he was crooked. I don’t know for certain that he was or wasn’t. So I’ll just leave at that, I guess it depends how much you trust el compa que te dijo.

    And I don’t want to get to far into this but many media outlets in Mexico attack Calderon and PAN like they have a vandetta, probably with the exception of the big television channels. La Jornada are not shy of being socialist if you can’t call them communist. I’m not a fan of Calderon but it’s not like PRD or especially PRI would be any less corrupt. And let’s not forget Sinaloa invaded the Gulf’s territory before Calderon was in office. Sure Fox was PAN but if PRI won that year I’m pretty sure they would of backed Sinaloa just the same in their offensive just as the PAN did. The Zetas also spread as far as they did before Felipe became President. This big ass drug war was going to happen no matter who was president. Plus no matter who was President a government must atleast always appear to have authority over it’s territory. When the Zetas and the Sinaloans went at it it was sure to keep on escalating wethere or not Calderon send in the troops. And when two opposing groups have open warfare in your country you have no choice and respond to assert your authority.

    This is what begs me the most about all the reporting about Mexico’s drug war. They always repeat this fairytale about drug traffickers fighting for shrinking piece of the pie, even if most reporters ever cared to look the US government says Mexican drug traffickers influence is expanding within it’s territory. Their pie is getting bigger not smaller. The war did not start 2006, to me it began when Osiel was captured and Sinaloa tried to move on them. And because the Sinaloans moved in on them the Zetas turned into this freaking monster that it did. Oh and Juarez the same thing, that war would of happened regardless. If anyone cared to look on how it all got started, but most stupid journalist don’t, they just it’s because Calderon send in the troops and the cackdown made them fight eachother.

    Now Calderon has used the military for abusive and selfish reasons. In Michoacan he had a bunch of Mayors arrested with the the excused that they were being complicit with the La Family Michoacana. But if they were PAN instead PRD Calderon would of never touched them. That’s just one that I can think of the top of my head.

    So ends my rant.

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  16. Nice writing Michele
    @Lapuraneta
    We all know who he is and so would any other reader who might be looking for a good read on borrder issues or drug war..Why did that ruffle your feathers?? I think you might have some personal issues against this blog or narcos who are still at large maybe your employed by a certain group that holds Camarena in high regards sword of like martyr for those fighting against the drug cartels.(Not that it matters if it was up to me you would be more than welcome to keep posting).Camarena was rumored to be as corrupt as any common Mexican official but he had a flashy DEA badge instead of PGR one. I dont know if the fact that Marizco didnt include his name is what got you worked up but it kinda came off that way.He was protecting a certain cartel at a high prize and I guess it was better to get rid of him than keep paying and with that send a message to the DEA.Who knows but those have always been the rumors.
    @Isabella
    Mayo isnt completely protected he might be protected by the PAN political party but most certanly not by the PRI or PRD.Mayito was arrested in Mexico City not in his home state or the mountains his father hides in.He was originally a rural type a guy but as he grew he became more and more involved in the cities like Mazatlan for example.They are 2 diffrent people and Mayito might have had a lapse of judgement being in Mexico City.

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  17. @ la puñeta
    I am sure you r a closet sinaloa cowboy. Playing “la gente del Chapo” sang by los alegres del barranco while driving to work with your windows rolled up so no one hears you.

    @Mike nice break down on the interview.
    Well if you want to look at it by the Federation standpoint. Rumor say that occasionaly the Federation serves up some of its own people to the goverment so that it can take heat off them. If Mayo is war weary and distraught because he lost his son. What better way to take heat off the rest of the Federation than to trade himself for Vicente.

    Right now with all the focus being on the Zetas. Chapo improving his rep with the Jabaly interview. The stars are linning up for something big.

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  18. I would like to pose a question to everybody. What would happen another country had an agent undercover in the united states? What would happen if, for example an under cover AFI, or PGR agent from mexico was screwing with ” LaPuraNeNa”? or anybody else for that matter? I firmly believe what ever happens to someone trying sneak around in another country, is not important. The extradition thing is bullshit, as well as Dea, Cia, or any civil agency operating outside our borders. Why does the united states think they have the right to police the world? In a war I understand. In a matter of national security, I understand, in an economic war over a prohibited substance?

    @ LaPuraNena
    dude, renew your Zoloft perscription because you obviously have been out for a few days.

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  19. lapura neta…no te contesto como quisiera porque ya me han jalado las orejas por grosero, asi que ahi te dejo con el medallas bien ardido.

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  20. la neta nadien aqui sabemos verga…si el gobierno protege o no protege…si lo agarran es porque quiseron, si no lo agarran porque no quiseron. petunia madre, no tiene fin las mamadas que escriben en este sitio, pero como me causa jajajaja. Lo que yo si ser, es muy dificil a un papa entregar su hijo querido para quita un poco la quema. Y calderon le vale verga, es el unico presidente k yo kreo realmente esta combatiendo el narco, por eso esta el desmadre k hay. Pero sepa la chihuahuada, a la mejor si es un circo todo. Acabo ya ser ba acabar el puto mundo..yo chihuahuado importa cuidado con los sismos mexicali!

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  21. I asked a valid question, I wanted to know what you guys have knowledge off (especially if Rabbit mentioned something that seems plausible), whether it’s true or not. You never know about the truth, sometimes its in-between. Here in the U.S., what we know for sure is that every year there’s a charity golf tournament dedicated to his memory and that is disturbing as hell.

    Whether he was sketchy as hell or not, it’s interesting to wonder why major drug lords would go after him, it’s a sign that he had some sort of involvement. Like you guys say, they wouldn’t dare bring on that kind of heat if it wasn’t for a reason. Unfortunately, it triggered more than just heat, it caused an explosion, and gave the U.S. Dept. of Justice an excuse to spit on everyone’s constitution and extradite everyone allegedly involved, just like that. Granted, the actual evidence was mutilated and left for dead and even then there were more than enough convictions to go around. Now, after a quarter of a century, I doubt there’s any real evidence of Camarena’s involvement in anything, if there was anything left at that time, I’m sure someone cleaned up the mess.

    I know a couple of DEA agents and U.S. Marshals that work very hard and are genuinely good men who don’t exploit their positions. I know for a fact that they are going to make my job very difficult in the future and I will respect them more for it. Those are the men that truly deserve praise for their character. Not some sketchy agent, who the U.S. government practically canonized.

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  22. Interesting how a couple of ex-cons have this insider knowledge that Kiki Camarena was corrupt, but all they back it up with is RUMORS (not from a hitchhiker, but from a GOOD source). You Brainiacs figured this out, yet Charles Bowden and and every other credible journalist has never published any info to suggest Camarena was dirty.

    Even the “Cannabis Culture” website says this about Camarena:

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/articles/4768.html

    “What provoked Camarena and Zavala’s deaths was a bust they had initiated. The two were central in taking down the centerpiece of the Caro-Quintero clan’s operations in Chihuahua, a location called “El Bufalo” that had 13 pot farms ranging from 500 to 1,200 acres. Each of the farms had the capability of growing over one million plants each.

    But I’m sure “Cannabis Culture” is just part of the right wing conspiracy to cannonize Kiki Camarena…

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  23. Tantos those pothead sites don’t know anything. They are just as clueless as anyone else. Their only source of information regarding Kiki Camarena would be the official government source. That they used it doesn’t mean anything, except that that’s the only place they could of gone for information.

    And Charles Bowden did mention the RUMOR, he did not agree or disagree with it he just mentioned that it’s out there.

    Nobody here knows exactly what happened and that’s the only FACT there is.

    ILegal is always wrong so no one should listen to him.

    You see even the Beltranes are calling Barbie a pill popping homosexual. Told you he was gay.

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  24. This is US journalism at its best. How did we go from talking about El Mayo Zambada to Kiki. We went from current events to ancient history in a matter of key strokes. This is why nothing ever gets solved in the US. This is why I turn to these type of websites to avoid main stream media as usual.

    Insted of talking real issues we loop a story for 2 years of 1 Girl missing in Aruba, or photos of britney/paris or whomevers muff shot.

    Enrique Camarena was a hero & Pancho Villa was a Bandit whoever wins the battle gets to write about it. Leave the history to the historian.

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  25. To everybody:
    I am amazed how the creator of this site that posts the blogs and permits comments is so smart!
    Do you have any idea people what or who are the the people that are writing up comments on these blogs?
    This site is just another smart way to get info on drug related issues pending in the U,S, They’re using facebook, myspace and now they are targeting these kinds of sites. People against cartel organizations should just be informants and get paid for it, no? People in favor of the cartel organizations should maintain quiet and not let these writers play with your f* mind! Stop getting used for free people.

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  26. YeYo: I see what you’re talking about, and if so, it was a bad call on his part. I wonder if the same can be said for Vicente Carrillo-Leyva.

    Tantos: Okay, we won’t know what truly happened, but the only person that would know why he was tortured and killed has been dead for 25 years.

    El Cardian: I would rather eat dirt than pay for overpriced coffee.

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  27. Nilosdetectan: Or we could be confusing the hell out of them, it can go both ways.

    Michel is a skilled investigative reporter, which is why I’m still trying to catch up on the older posts. I’m not sure how I’ll be able to keep up during finals, but I’m going to make time for his work – it’s well worth it. Again, it’s one of the only blogs in English that has actual substance and information that’s worth looking into.

    I can read the New York Times, Time Magazine, Newsweek and articles from The Associated Press, but none of their reporters have been covering the Mexican drug cartels for years and none of them know the Mexican government. What their articles provide is just the surface and that’s nothing in comparison to what Michel provides.

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  28. I got a great laugh about Bachoco feeding ephedrine or any stimulants to growing broiler chickens. As a poultry nutritionist, I would say that there is absolutely no reason to believe that ephedrine is fed to growing broiler chickens nor laying hens nor to any other class of commercial poultry. The statement about keeping them awake so they eat more is pure B.S.

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  29. rather being wrong than being a fat parrot coward

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  30. “rather being wrong than being a fat parrot coward”

    At least I like parrot unlike Arturo.

    Sorry I had to do that, he just gave me a great openinng. LOL.

    Calm down ILegal I just having a little fun at your expense. So tell what does el compa say about Chaguin and Isidro. Todo al cien still?

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  31. Only damn idiots would take my words and take the stance that DEA agents play both sides of the fence to do their job.

    Here is the reality, Kiki Camerena was a cop playing the corrupt card. The Mexicans got tired of the outsider meddling in their business and killed his ass rather than continue to play with him. I didn’t hear anything from a hitchiker. The truth is the truth. Prove my words wrong. You cannot. I won’t mix irrational verbatum with obviouse assholes. Call me what you will. I know my history, as I have been a part of that history.

    DEA agents don’t play both sides of the fence. They befriend and betray. They didn’t give camerena the chance to betray. That’s a fact.

    I am not an advocate of any of the violence in Mexico, so don’t construe my words. Facts are facts. Believe what you want. I don’t give a fook. Bowden is an inteligent man. I enjoy his reads, but again facts are facts.

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  32. Wow this truly is a great site as soon as I get my unemployment check I’m donating!!

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  33. @ Trols,

    Please leave. You are annoying!

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  34. But seriously great job michel keep it up very informative.(and I’m serious about donating I just need my check)!

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  35. @Cielo Blanco
    All it took was a google seach and I found that the layer pellets used to harden egg shell and to provide a balnce diet can turned into what evr it take to make that shit…LoL..In a friendly way…Even got you instructions guy but I dont advocate meth usage so let the rednecks kill themself with it if they like it so much.

    1 The laying meal is placed in a large container, such as a five-gallon (20 litre) plastic or metal bucket.
    Methanol, acetone, or a mixture of both, is added to the meal and is soaked for four to six hours. The liquid is decanted from the meal through large filter papers or through several layers of cheese-cloth into another bucket.
    2 The solvent is evaporated at ambient temperature with a fan or by gentle heating on a stove or hot-plate. The residue is then dried and used.
    3 One recipe suggested placing the residue in cookie sheets and spraying it with ethyl ether, then drying in an oven until hard like a brick, breaking it into chunks, and sifting with a final cut of vitamin B12 or Vita-Blend. This recipe reported an approximate yield of 16 to 20 pounds (7.2-9.0 kg) of material from a 100 pound (45 kg) sack of feed.

    @Move
    You heard ole frutty but Barbie has his own cartel now?? Somthing like Cartel del Sur Pacifico or some bullshit.I always wonder how long he will last you got to belive he is hated by many..I also heard he alinged himself to the Sinaloa, FM, and CDG crowd is that true??

    @All the feds cops and noesey fookers,
    Why would you take a guys word on any drug related comments made on this blog?? Nobody here knows anything for certain its all he said she said shit..Un compa me dijo type shit, if you really want to know wutz good go down there like KiKI did and find out.You got to admire a guy with that type of love for his job I mean put his life and his familiys life in danger over a problem that will never be solved..Hats of to KiKi evrybody!! You are a true American,
    P.S..Where just a bunch of internet narco theorist puro compa mamon de el terre que le gusta el pedo.

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  36. This shit is moving fast today..Marizco you should be proud of your work your reaching out to all kinds of people all over the country..I think you need a spell check for the comments pa los pinches paisas como yo just look at my last post.

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  37. Hey is isabella a dude?hey I’m just askin that’s all

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  38. @Cielo Blanco
    Holy shit!!!! My apologies..I never fineshed reading the hole study conducted on the subject and the conclusion of it stated that test where done with no results of any chemicals even after the hole process I copied and pasted..lol..sorry

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  39. @Yeyo.

    Barbie run a cartel? I wouldn’t give the bumb a mop job. This is exactly what happened with Teo, how did he end up? Barbie can’t last long on his own, he’s too stupid and Sinaloa, FM and CDG won’t gain anything from bringing him along . He will just be used to weaken Hector, and Sinaloa and La Familia will gain territory in Guerrero. That’s what I think will happen.

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  40. why you want to be her “John”?

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  41. nice one joto cobarde, you are already jumping into conclusions without knowing nothing but shit, el cartel del pacifico sur is a branch of La Empresa and it’s being run by “el comeniños”.

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  42. John stated, “Wow this truly is a great site as soon as I get my unemployment check I’m donating!!”

    Thank you John! That would be so thoughtful of you (if you can’t read it, I’m being sarcastic). Now, in all seriousness, while you’re at it (donating), you should also invest on a grammar book, it seems like you need it. You never know, if you lay off the booze and the meth, you might just be able to find a good job and if you’re lucky you won’t have to write a word.

    And if you must know, since you’re so interested, I’m just a girl.

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  43. Ilegal: Y porque lo llaman El Comeniños? Claro, si se puede saber.

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  44. asi le puso su compadre porque es un amigo de mas seis pies, corpulento, cabezon y casi sin cuello.

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  45. a ver cobarde, ponte a investigar enchihuahua a ver si sabes de quien hablo, esta facil.

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  46. Gracias Ilegal.

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  47. Mario-

    What’s up with the shake down in TJ?? you know what kind of places I’m talking about that are getting hit too…

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  48. @Illegal
    entonces donde queda La Barbie en todo reboruje??Yo pensaba que era un perro el guey.But judging by what you are saying he aint even on shit..But he has to be ridding with sombody all the media outlets are saying he calls it for CPS and apperently they went on a little tagging spree recently (which I think is fooken gay).I got another souce saying the opposite that CPS want his ass for fooking around in Morelos.I will copy and paste this manta for you guys.
    “EL CARTEL DE
    PACIFICO SUR ES UNA ORGANIZACION DEDICADA UNICAMENTE AL COMERCIO DE
    DROGAS, NOSOTROS NUNCA HARIAMOS DAÑOS A LA FAMILIAS MORELENSES Y DE
    OTROS ESTADOS EL SEÑOR DE LA RESISTENCIA, NOS TIENE EXTRICTAMENTE
    PROHIBIDO HACER ESTO, JAMAS NOS METERIAMOS CON PERSONAS QUE LLEVAN SU
    VIDA NORMAL Y QUE TRABAJAN HONRRADAMENTE PARA LLEVAR UN SUSTENTO A SU
    FAMILIA… LA AUTORIZACION HA LLEGADO POR PARTE DEL “JEFE” LAS ORDENES SON
    CLARAS ELIMINAR A TODOS LOS MIEMBROS QUE TRABAJEN PARA “EDGAR VALDEZ
    VILLAREAL”(LA BARBIE) QUE NOS TRAICIONO Y SE METIO CON EL PUEBLO Y A
    TODOS AQUELLOS QUE TENGAN NEXOS CON EL TENEMOS LA ORDEN DE LA
    “RESISTENCIA” CPS, DE MATAR, DESCUARTIZAR, DECAPITAR UNO POR UNO. ATT:
    CPS.

    Se lo van a chihuahuar al guey.He aint got no pull anywhere that I know of mayb e the Zetas might back him but I doubt it.

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  49. viejo el cps es parte del cartel de los Beltran Leyva y lo maneja Sergio Villarreal, El Grande o El Comeniños.

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  50. “you are already jumping into conclusions without knowing nothing but shit”

    ILegal do I have birng up all the times you’ve been wrong again. I never said anything about CPS. I just talked about Barbie being called gay by the people he used to work for. You see even more evidence that Arturo and Barbie were lovers. Doesn’t it seem strange to you that when Arturo died he was surrounded by a bunch of boys that were in their 20s. He was old to hang aroung guys that young unless he wanted to fook them.

    I don’t know anything about this CPS. That’s why I didn’t say anything about them, although it was obvious as hell that is one of the already existing groups just changing their name. That shit is done all the time why are so happy you know about it.

    ILegal I never claimed to know those low level fools you claim to talk on phone all day. Honestly what does el comeninos gonna do. Anyone stupid enough to fight for the Beltranes at this point in the game is too stupid to matter. Even Barbie had the sense to ditch them.

    Tell me ILegal where is that other homo called Chaguin. El de los calibre 50. The guy who had 200 men from el Chapo and Mayo in Noria killed. I know he is not dead. I telling you ILegal as soon as you name drop someone he ends up dead,useless, switches sides, or runs away. Just cheerlead Shorty and Mayo that will surely be their doom.

    La Empresa or CPS or whatever you want to call them, if they are connected to the Beltranes they don’t matter.

    La Familia and Chapo’s people are in Guerrero, you really think they won’t gain from the Beltranes fighting their ex partner.

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  51. low level fools i talk on the phone? that’s a new one…

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  52. by boys around their 20s? estaba el hijo de chalo, y otros pistoleros, jovenes pork la juventud es la k le vale verga, y ser anima a peliar.

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  53. “low level fools i talk on the phone? that’s a new one”

    You don’t have a sense of humor huh ILegal.

    Tell me did Arturo ever try to seduce you when you were shinning his shoes?

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  54. all this crap you always talk about homos, being gay, and a man trying to seduce another man is making me uncomfortable, you should get some help man.

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  55. Those kids were close to Arturo, they were more than his gunmen. In fact they weren’t really his gunmen. Just because your daddy was one and you pose with guns on your Myspace that doesn’t make you a killer. Arturo had to many kids in their 20s that are can’t hadle what he gave them working for him.

    Chalito for example. What the fook was that kid usefull for? Nothing that’s what.

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  56. “all this crap you always talk about homos, being gay, and a man trying to seduce another man is making me uncomfortable, you should get some help man.”

    That’s the only way you can talk when you talk about Arputo. I can’t help it. He was running a crew of homos including you.

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  57. Dont mean to get into yalls convo but, I heard Chalito was a ruthless killer since he was 16 yrs old…Granted Arturo should have surounded himself with smarter people instead of a bunch of ed hardy, gay looking, wipper snappers maybe then he would have had the sense to gat the fook out of the state insted of sitting around and corraling himself for the Marina.Who BTW I heard is extra tight with the Zetas just as the army is with Sinaloa but a hitchiker told me that one.

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  58. My first trip into this blog, I stumbled here via another forum.

    Damn, I have alot to learn, that is for sure.

    What I have an interest in is the immigration issue. How do the cartels affect the border policy immigration wise? Are they the ones pulling major strings at the border with officials who may be corrupt, complicit, etc?

    And what about the interior of the US? I assume that there is an extensive network of Mexican nationals residing throughout the country who are contacts?

    Forgive my ingnorance, seriously. My only experience with any type of this was when I was a kid growing up in NorCal deep in the mtns. during the seventies. The local sherrif was indeed corrupt, and the local growers competed with each other to gain his ensured security at the right price. Thats all about I know….

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  59. @Yeyo

    If you listen to the rumors all the little Jr’s are ruthless killers and I don’t buy it. To me if anyone of those Jr’s ever killed it’s because they are cruel not because he is any good at it. And I’m not talking just killing but also planning and strategy. Even if Chalito was a killer he was still stupid enough to be next to Arturo like a sitting duck. Chalito to me was just looking for a father figure.

    And this is not limited to Arturo, I feel the same way of los Antrax, I can’t take them seriously. To me they are just brats playing with their parents money and a bunch of free loading freinds. At least Mayo and Chapo were smart enough to not give them anything important, Arturo wasn’t.

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  60. i leave for a second y el desmadre se arma………..

    ora si amáres se alinean o los alineo……………hhahahaahah…

    como dijo un compa……….

    “no soy dado a los enrededos mucho menos conflicto, ay arreglo o no hay arreglo? ol o arreglamos a tiros?”

    tan…tan…ajjuuuaaa

    y arriba el CPS ke akava de recibir el apoyo del azul del cielo………ora si barbie traicionera y el mentado indio joto tambien les akava de llegar un trailer a la empresa con puras cobijas tipo san marcos hechos en china of course y de cinta canela tambien pa darle sus encobijadas a tus tacuaches………

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  61. Todos Los k pelian are fools…Los inteligentes son los que no son famosos y andan pasar y pasar mercancia sin esta peliando…todos el k peliar tarde temprano Les ba chihuahuar su madre

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  62. The mexican government pulled the trigger on the interview and El Mayo was chosen to be the voice. From what I hear, he is a simple man that leads a simple life. From what you all say on the site, the Calderon Administration is in bed with the Sinaloans. It makes perfect sense that the Mexican Government is starting a PR campaign to make Chapo/Mayo look like “farmers” as they continue to strike at the Zetas, Levyas and other cartels. Chapo/El Mayo have fed Calderon big time bucks to campaign his way into office. Calderon has to fight the narco’s, but needs to protect the ones that helped get him where he is. This PR campaign seems like a good way to do it.

    As far as El mayito being arrested and sent to Chicago, it seems as if most druglords have spent time in jail. It’s like paying your dues. All these druglords have spent time or escaped from jail and now run big time operations. El Mayito spends 5-10 years in jail, gets released and then returns to badiraguato to take over for Chapo/Mayo. They are grooming him to take over. It was a negotiated arrest between Sinaloans and the Calderon Admin; and then between Calderon and the US. The US looks good for busting a high profile memeber and the Sinaloans get the government off their back and the whispers of Calderon being in their back pocket seize.

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  63. Where can we find the transcripts from El Mayo’s interview with el proceso in english?

    Where can we find any transcripts from El Mayito’s questioning from US officials? I would assume these are not public record, but if they are where would a person find these?

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  64. Nevermind on that El Mayo article.

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  65. rabbit ur exactly right kiki was playing both sides many of these people just talk and dont know a damn thing about anything

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  66. @ ALL

    Again, bringing some clarity to the topic….a great stunt, a great trick, before the show begins? Question is: who’s performing? what was the actual announcement?

    A director of another political magazine writes:

    On Wednesday 7th April 2010:

    “sí. en 2008, en el universal, los editores @ddaaponte y carlos benavides me comentaron que una periodista había recibido una invitación para entrevistar a joaquín “el chapo” guzmán, y que necesitaban mi aprobación. les dije sin dudar que no. se sorprendieron y justifiqué la decisión: 1) ¿no era una trampa para la periodista? ¿cómo podríamos garantizar su seguridad? 2) asumiendo que no era una trampa, ¿cuál podría ser el propósito de una invitación? sólo una: que querrían utilizar a la periodista y al periódico para enviar un mensaje. 3) si esas eran las premisas de la entrevista, ¿podría hacer las preguntas que tendría que hacer o simplemente tendría que reproducir lo que le dijera guzmán? si eso fuera así, estaríamos haciendo propaganda. 4) suponiendo que pudiera hacer las preguntas y que no se molestara, y que se publicara como nosotros quisiéramos, ¿qué podrían pensar los cárteles adversarios? les dije: que tomamos partido por guzmán, por lo que llevaríamos el conflicto entre el narco a las puertas de el universal. 5) ¿exigirían derecho de réplica otros cárteles? o simplemente ¿nos colocarían una cabeza en la puerta del diario? 6) si es un criminal, ¿tendríamos que dar parte a las autoridades? si no, ¿estaríamos violando la ley? (no lo dije en aquél momento pero en una ocasión, después de vetar un pulitzer al chicago sun times, que todos pensaban que le sería otorgado por haber operado subrepticiamente un bar cerca del departamento de policía de chicago para documentar la corrupción policial, ben bradlee, el legendario director de the washington post, explicó que no podrían premiar un trabajo contra la ilegalidad realizado sobre la ilegalidad). 7)si por cosas totalmente ajenas a la reportera, poco después de la entrevista guzmán se topara con la policía o los militares y tuviera un enfrentamiento o fuera detenido, ¿no pensarían que la reportera lo “puso”?. todos estos argumentos eran resultado de un largo tiempo en que venía pensando sobre el tema. los dos editores no esataban de acuerdo y decían que era un golpe periodístico. alegué en su momento que no pensaba que una invitación de esa naturaleza podría ser un golpe periodístico, sino un ejercicio de propaganda. tengo amigos periodistas que sí realizarían una entrevista con un capo del narcotráfico. respeto sus razones, pero les he preguntado si no ven una diferencia entre buscar una entrevista con un narcotraficante y que el narcotraficante invite a un periodista a hablar con él. yo sí veo una diferencia importante que tiene que ver con los términos planteados para ese encuentro: si alguien busca la entrevista y finalmente persuade al interlocutor a darla, el interlocutor deberá esperar que le pueden hacer preguntas que le incomoden. si el narcotraficante invita, no está en su cabeza que le puedan o deban hacer esas preguntas. al contrario, si acude al llamado en esos términos, es probable, en la lógica de los narcos, que piense que es su aliado. respeto a mis amigos que buscarían una entrevista con un narco, pero sigo pensando exactamente lo mismo que pensé en 2008. “

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  67. I’m horrible at Math, but here goes, 300 million people in the U.S. If you guessed that 15% of Americans smoke Dope daily, that would make 4 and a half million. If you can get 50 pinners per oz. and assume each American only smokes one per day, that makes by my calculations,…… Eight Gazillion reefers per hour!…… Dang!

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  68. Probably should have stayed in school and not done so many……er….drugs, I guess…..

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  69. Trols? That’s funny! Too bad they are everywhere.

    Anyways, good interesting article. Although let’s not forget that Mr. Zambada is a criminal or as he claim, he used to be. At least that is what he has said. He might be a rancher and such but I just can’t imagine him not being in the drug game anymore. His existence depends on his protection money that he has to pay unless Chapo gave him one of his billions or he managed to save hundreds of millions. Nevertheless, he is alive and kicking further sign that the Mexican government has failed. Furthermore, he is seen as a legendary figure in Mexican culture and seems to be pretty well respected.

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  70. El Chapo And His Billions… : )

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  71. Marcus! That is a good opinion but that is pretty much it. El Mayo wouldn’t give up his son like that plus there is no guarantee that he will be out in 5 to 7 years. What if he gets 30? The only thing that does sound right is that drug traffickers do pay their dues by doing time. It’s part of it i guess.

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  72. El Chapo And His Billions… : )

    I’ve noticed more and more mentioning of El Chapo and his billion$… I believe the Forbes listing can be both right and wrong at the same time. Here’s an example of what I mean… The news (and tv programs such as COPS) very often do their math at disproportioned numbers. They’ll claim that a certain load of busted dope would be worth “so many millions” on the street and so on. And when I do my numbers, the digits are always quiet lower, hence; media sensationalization. Now In Chapos’ case, I can imagine that those hundreds of millions, or billion(s) as is reported don’t end up all for Mr. Guzman Loera… Always remember that all levels of government protection and security through corruptive means is very expensive. In short terms, Chapo has not just Mexico, but most of Central America to pay-off the route plazas. I’m not doubting his billions. I do doubt that he has billions just for himself. Those billions are distributed amongst the corrupt masses mentioned prior…

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  73. And obviously much of those greenbacks are taking care of Mr. Calderon… : )

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  74. Ay veces que el cielo niega la lluvia…

    Y ay veces que cuando llueve truena…

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  75. That last comment was just a thought to Michels title… : )

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  76. @ EnPokasPalabras,
    Oh, see; that’s good. Where were you yesterday when I was trying to think up of one.

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  77. Marcus: Call his lawyer in New York, his name is Edward Panzer.

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  78. LMAO
    I’ll make a donation as soon as I get my food stamps…
    But I trolls…Qs mi

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  79. @ Tontos

    That is a great article! Loved every paragraph, but it’s hard not to question some of the number and “facts” Hooks was putting out there! Thanks for posting that link!

    I guarantee you 99% of the know-it-alls on the forum (including myself) had not f’n clue who Hooks is/was!!

    That’s what tends to light a fire in my ass!! F’n loudmouths who think highly of themselves because they believe they have the inside scoop, and this in turn, in some tiny, insignificant way relates them to their f’n narco Heroes!!

    And that’s all I gotta say about that!!

    Great F’N article!! It’s a must read for everyone!!

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  80. Man I love this shit….gets my day going…

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  81. The end of the GUADALAJARA CARTEL (THE Enrique “KI KI” Camarena story) DEA AGENT KI KI CAMARENA was undercover for two years trying to infiltrate the GUADALAJARA CARTEL, at the time the biggest cartel in MEXICO.DEA. ‘Kiki’ Camarena and Mexican reconnaissance pilot Alfredo Zavala Avelar were central in taking down the centerpiece of the Caro-Quintero clan’s operations in Chihuahua, a location called ‘El Bufalo’ that had 13 pot farms ranging from 500 to 1,200 acres. Each of the farms had the capability of growing over one million plants each. The DEA claimed that the raid resulted in the seizure of 8,000 tons of marijuana (sixteen million pounds). ………Michael Hooks, the man who ran the smuggling operation for the pot, laughs at that figure. “There might have been that much there,” he told the Fort Worth Weekly when he recently surfaced for a few days, “but some was still growing, some was drying, some was being cleaned. In any event, the Mexican government returned a lot of it within a week or so. And it was probably returned with apologies.” Whatever the figure, it is among the biggest pot busts in history. ……………………………………………. On February 7th 1985, DEA agent Enrique ‘Kiki’ Camarena Salazar was kidnapped, along with Alfredo Zavala Avelar, shortly after leaving the DEA Headquarters in Guadalajara on the way to meet his wife for lunch. (Two witnesses were rounded up that reported that as he left the consulate, he was surrounded by five gunmen and shoved into the backseat of a waiting car. The witnesses said the gunment appeared to be members of Mexican Secret Police.) ……..When he didn’t show up, Camarena’s wife contacted US Ambassador John Gavin, who contacted Mexican authorities and asked that a search be started. The Mexican authorities weren’t quick to respond, so the US initiated Operation Camarena, stopping and searching every vehicle passing from Mexico into the US and turning the border crossing into a nightmare along its entire 2,000-mile span. One month later, on March 6th, someone tipped authorities that the bodies of both Camarena and Zavala could be found on a roadside 60 miles south of Guadalajara. The DEA soon got a copy of an audiotape of the torture session that lated for nine hours and ended with two deaths. Those who’ve heard the tape say it is unbearable to listen to. The recordings were made at an estate in Guadalajara, the prosecutors said. They said the Mexican police seized the tapes at a defendant’s home in Puerta Vallarta. He was kept alive by Dr. Humberto Alvarez Machain The DEA believes that respondent, a medical doctor, participated in the murder by prolonging agent Camarena’s life so that others could further torture and interrogate him………. As DEA later reconstructed the events, Camanera and his pilot Alfredo Zavala Avelares who also had been captured were driven to a remote ranch owned by Rubén Zuno Arce. Over the next thirty hours both men were subjected to savage beatings as the drug lords attempted to learn how much the DEA agent knew about their enterprise. Camarena was given repeated injections of amphetamines to keep him conscious throughout the session. The interrogation and torture were tape recorded by the gang and their associates in the DFS. On the tapes, Mr. Camarena’s interrogators focus on the identity of the drug agency’s informers in Mexico. Mr. Camarena named two informers and told where they lived. He also gave directions to the home of a fellow agent in Mexico. Mr. Camarena is heard groaning and crying out in pain throughout the recordings, which run nearly two hours. ”Don’t hit me anymore,” the agent is heard saying several times. ‘No One Will Hit You’ ”No,” the interrogator replies calmly. ”No one will hit you.” But later in the tape Mr. Camarena is heard moaning in pain. ”Don’t hurt my family, please,” Mr. Camarena is heard saying in a quiet voice. ”No one is going to hurt your family,” the interrogator replies. ”Forget about that. They are not to blame for anything.” ”You just keep on remembering, that is all,” the interrogator goes on. ”I am not going to hit you or anything. O.K.?” ‘I Don’t Know Any’ Much of the interrogation dealt with questions about how much Mr. Camarena knew about Mr. Caro’s Mexican drug empire. Mr. Camarena said he knew little, not even where Mr. Caro lived. ”Give me people that go around with Caro,” the interrogator asks at one point. Mr. Camarena replies: ”I don’t know any, commander. If I knew I would tell you, sir. I tell you that I am here with fear.” Drug lords used a Mexican physician to bring Camarena back, time after time, during the cruel torture regime. Eventually, in response to U.S. pressure, a Mexican court issued an order for Caro Quintero’s arrest. Nevertheless, a few days later, Caro Quintero and a half-dozen of his pistoleros, all armed and carrying official papers identifying them (falsely) as Mexican police, appeared quite openly at the Guadalajara airport to board the drug king’s private plane. While sixty state and federal cops looked on, Caro Quintero consulted briefly with First Comandante Jorge Armando Pavon Reyes, head of the police detail, handed him a check for sixty million pesos (then worth about U.S. $265,000), and flew off to Costa Rica. On the way, Caro Quintero stopped to pick up his teenage paramour, Sara Cristina Cosio Martinez. The DEA picked up the trail through her telephone calls to her parents. In April 1985, Costa Rican police arrested them, and they were flown to jail in Mexico. Sara Cristina, as a minor, was returned to her parents, insisting that she had been kidnapped. Shortly thereafter, another suspect in the Camarena murder, Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo aka DON NETO , sixty, a relative of Caro Quintero and his mentor in the drug business, was arrested in Puerto Vallarta with 23 followers. Fourteen of these turned out to be policemen on his payroll. Fonseca Carrillo and Caro Quintero between them employed more than one hundred cops or ex-cops, according to the DEA. Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo is the uncle of AMADO CARILLO FUENTES aka The Lord of the Skies, He was widely seen as a mentor to his nephew, one of Mexico’s most important drug traffickers before he died during surgery to change his appearance in 1997 According to Mexican officials, Fonseca told them last week that he had seen Camarena and Caro Quintero at the ranch the day after the kidnapings. Fonseca said that he and Caro Quintero were angry with the agent over a police and army raid on a plantation in Chihuahua, owned by the two drug dealers, in which 8,000 tons of marijuana were burned. Fonseca added that the intention had been to question Camarena and offer him a bribe. He also claimed that he was too drunk to talk to Camarena until the next day, when Caro Quintero allegedly told him, “Well, see if you can still reach him, because he is no longer speaking.” The agent, Fonseca explained, had been brutally beaten, but was still alive. “Now you have done it!” Fonseca said he screamed. He claimed that he slapped Caro Quintero and called him a pig. In all, 22 people were indicted in connection with the deaths of Mr. Camarena; his pilot, Alfredo Zavala Avelar, and two tourists mistaken for United States law-enforcement agents. other participants apprehended and sentenced..

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  82. Found this on another site

    The states of Morelos and Guerrero – The escalating violence in Morelos and Guerrero comes from the dispute between Edgar Valdez Villarreal, “La Barbie” and Héctor Beltrán Leyva, “El H” who are fighting for control of the drug trafficking routes from Acapulco to Chihuahua, said official military sources.

    The military has counted at least 52 narco-banners in the last 9 days from CPS “El Cartel del Pacifico del Sur” directed to “La Barbie” warning him that he is no longer in business.

    The messages are related to at least 10 executions in Morelos and 19 in Guerrero, according to data from the National Military Defense.

    The intelligence information is proof of realignment for the feuding cartels are attempting to ensure the most important routes of drug trafficking in the center of the country which starts from Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Ixtepec and Acapulco, that passes through Guerrero, Morelos, Mexico City and Puebla, to eventually reach Zacatecas, Torreon and Ciudad Juárez.

    However, according to the military, other places of drug trafficking activities for the Beltran Leyva are Nuevo Leon, Sonora and Tamaulipas.

    “Some of these 52 narco-banners have been reported to the military, some of the banners were found covering dismembered bodies or written on walls of damaged businesses whose owners are believed to support Valdez Villarreal.

    The reality is that the internal feud is causing violence and insecurity in Morelos, said a military commander consulted via telephone. After the death of Arturo Beltran Leyva “El Barbas” last December, the organization of Beltran Leyva underwent several re-alignments in its command structure.

    “La Barbie”, who was the chief sicario of “El Barbas”, was left out of the leadership structuring from “El H”, who instead chose Sergio Villarreal, “El Grande”, to lead the sicarios.

    When “El Barbie” became part of “La Empresa,” “El H” decided 9 ago days ago to form the Cártel del Pacífico Sur (CPS) the name he gave to his new cartel, which seeks to control the drug trade in Morelos, Guerrero and part of Puebla.

    After the restructuring of the cartel, Valdez Villarreal went on his own to do his separate business and was considered a traitor. Streets and building walls in Cuernavaca served every day in March as sources of threats and recriminations between “La Barbie” and “El H” through the use of blankets, cardboard, attacks and executions.

    On March 27, the structure of “El H” still signed messages as “La Empresa,” a name that had been used for months in Morelos and Guerrero to launch threats against Valdez Villarreal and his operators.

    The messages that were sent under the name of Cártel Pacífico Sur uses the same type of messages that were written under the signature “La Empresa” which the authorities of Morelos believe it might be the same group.

    In the mean time the leadership of the Labor Party in Morelos has urged the Governor Marco Adame Castillo to assume his responsibility in fighting against the insecurity and violence in the state.

    “It is necessary for the Governor to unite the political society across the state and provide real information on the violence,” said Tania Valentina Rodriguez Ruiz, political representative of the PT.

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  83. de omnibus dubitandum

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  84. Legalize drugs??????

    Alot of people say that we should legalize drugs. Well I live in California and I was reading the LA times this morning. In the LA times their is an article about Humboldt County. Wait let me back up.

    California has a law on the ballot for this comming up election to legalize marijuana for recreational use. They already have a law in place for medical use.

    Well back in the 70′s humboldt county became the mecca for weed smoking hippies. They moved their and began ilegaly growing and selling weed. Now it is a major ilegal contributor to their economy.

    The article went on to say that with this new law on the ballot. They are worried that the big tabacco companies are going to move in and drive down the cost of weed and basically kill their economy. I Believe they are even having town hall meetings about this and have begun a smear campaign to kill the new law.

    What i find funny about this is that they are not portrayed as a bunch of blood thirsty Mexican with AK47s. They are look at as struggling farmers trying to make ends meet for their families in a bad economy with limited resources. How long before these white hippies label themselves as “Cartel del Pacifico Norte” and start killing each other off.

    Michel can you dig somthing up on this one looks really interesting

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  85. Here is the article (Hope I am not breaking any copyright laws)

    April 07, 2010|By Sam QuinonesReporting from Garberville, Calif. —

    In this region renowned for potent marijuana buds, many in Humboldt County long accepted that legalizing the weed was the right thing to do.
    Now some folks aren’t so sure. A statewide initiative in November would allow cities to regulate pot possession and cultivation. Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco) has proposed a broader legalization. Neither is certain to pass.
    Yet as medical marijuana has spread and city and state budgets are being slashed, legalized marijuana is becoming more possible than ever. That has some people here thinking twice.
    Wholesale prices have dropped in the last five years — from $4,000 a pound to below $3,000 for the best cannabis — as medical-marijuana dispensaries have attracted a slew of new growers statewide, Humboldt growers say.
    Recently, “Keep Pot Illegal” bumper stickers have been seen on cars around the county. In chat rooms and on blogs, anonymous writers predict that tobacco companies will crush small farmers and take marijuana production to the Central Valley.
    With legalization, if residents don’t act, “we’re going to be ruined,” said Anna Hamilton, a radio host on KMUD-FM (91.1) in southern Humboldt County.
    In March, Hamilton organized a community meeting in Garberville addressing the question “What’s After Pot?” It attracted more than 150 people, including a county supervisor, economic development consultants and business owners.
    All this was unimaginable to the hippies and student radicals who came here in the 1960s and ’70s, escaping a conventional world they abhorred. As marijuana’s price steadily rose, it funded their escape. In time, mom-and-pop growers became experts.
    The plant thrived in the tolerant climate — cultural and geographic — of far Northern California. Small plots got bigger. An Emerald Triangle of premium marijuana growers formed in Humboldt, Trinity and Mendocino counties until, virtually alone, they supported the economies.
    Following Hamilton’s lead, a meeting will be held in Ukiah, Mendocino’s county seat, on April 24 to discuss “The Future of Cannabis in Northern California.” Speakers include the director of the Ukiah Chamber of Commerce.
    For years the plant was only a small part of the Humboldt economy, as logging and fishing provided most of the jobs.

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  86. Today, harvestable redwoods are mostly gone; so, too, the sawmills. Salmon beds are covered with silt. Marijuana stands as a major source of income, even for many whose grandparents worked the sawmills and 40 years ago railed at the pot-smoking hippies moving into their midst.
    Humboldt State economists guess that marijuana accounts for between $500 million and $700 million of the county’s $3.6 billion economy.
    Though growing is widespread, particularly in southern Humboldt County, it remains illegal for those not connected to a medical marijuana collective. Every year growers are arrested and sent to prison. Some live in paranoid isolation, telling their children not to discuss their parents’ work. Meanwhile, they’ve gotten used to selling a weed for thousands of dollars a pound.
    Legalization could take many forms. But the conventional wisdom here is that fully legal weed might fetch no more than a few hundred dollars a pound, as more people grow it and police no longer pull up millions of plants a year.
    Illegal marijuana “is the government’s best agricultural price-support program ever,” said Gerald Myers, a retired engineer and former volunteer fire chief who moved to the county in 1970. “If they ever want to help the wheat farmers, make wheat illegal.”
    On the other hand, increased demand for legal pot might buoy its price.
    “If it’s regulated like cigarettes, you’re going to have a massive increase in demand for it, I would believe,” said Erick Eschker, economics professor at Humboldt State. Either way, though, talk of legalization raises a question: Is Humboldt’s competitive advantage in growing pot, or in growing pot illegally?
    Plantations divert water from streams and rivers. Some growers use huge diesel generators to power greenhouses on mountainsides — growing indoors in the outdoors. Occasional spills from these generators have devastated streams. Indoor growers, meanwhile, devour electricity. Officials estimate that 800 to 2,000 houses in Arcata are devoted partly or entirely to growing marijuana. Humboldt County is also known for its lax prosecution compared with other counties.
    “That advantage, if you will, is going to be gone if it’s legal,” Eschker said.
    Any well-designed legalization ought to ensure that “other people in the community won’t have to pick up the tab for an industry cutting corners,” said county Supervisor Mark Lovelace. “People would have to learn to turn this into a legit above-board business.”
    How many could do that is unclear.
    At stake, many locals say, is more than a business; it’s a way of life. The cannabis economy has spawned numerous nonprofits and community health and arts groups, which depend on growers for sustenance.
    “It’s morally right that marijuana be legal,” said Kym Kemp, a journalist who blogs about life in southern Humboldt County. “But I know why they want to say, ‘No, don’t let this happen to us,’ because we’re going to die. It already happened with the logging industry.”
    But others say legalization would create a more solid, independent economy in the long run for the county, which has a population of 129,000. Instead of depending on one crop, “the community would learn all over again about economic self-sufficiency” that the original hippies moved here to achieve, Myers said.
    More houses and agricultural land might again find legal uses, the theory goes, thus making property more affordable. The county might actually be invigorated, said Clif Clendenen, a Humboldt County supervisor and owner of an apple cider business in Fortuna.
    “It saps some community energy when you have your best and brightest out in the hills growing and not contributing in the same way they would if they went off to college and came back to teach,” he said. “Whenever you have 20-year-olds making six-figure incomes, it’s an economic house of cards.”
    Once legal, marijuana cultivation might well lose its outlaw glamour, to be replaced by the daily grind and smaller profits that farmers all face. Growers would have to keep books, pay taxes and abide by pesticide regulations.
    Grocery stores, car dealers, construction-supply outlets and other retailers would have to adjust. So, too, would thousands of residents, many with full-time jobs, who make ends meet by trimming marijuana at harvest season for $25 an hour.
    With so few voters, Humboldt is unlikely to influence what happens statewide. “We’re better off trying to figure out what the pathway would be to a robust industry cluster with [marijuana] as its product,” said Kathy Moxon of the Humboldt Area Foundation, a community nonprofit.
    Radio host Hamilton has suggested new school curricula, urging that a community college satellite campus planned for Garberville offer more classes in accounting and business administration. Others have proposed classes in marijuana testing.
    Moxon sees an opportunity to take business away from Oakland-based Oaksterdam University, which offers classes in marijuana growing, the science of cannabis, new methods of ingestion, even the weed’s history.
    “We’re the place where people should come to learn to grow,” Moxon said. “Who wants to go to Oakland to learn to grow?”
    Then there is the Napa Valley model, where vintners thrive by focusing on premium wines, branding and wine tourism. Appellation — the branding of the Humboldt name like Champagne or Bordeaux — is a route people here find promising.
    But achieving a Napa Valley of marijuana might require the kind of collective action that Humboldt weed growers have found anathema. Remarkably, Hamilton’s “What’s After Pot?” meeting was the first time the topic was discussed so openly and thus stunned many locals. And no one seems to have investigated how a Humboldt appellation might be acquired.
    Still, the idea resonates.
    Said Hamilton: “It’s appellation or Appalachia.”

    sam.quinones@latimes.com

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  87. T_R_C: You mentioned a couple of books in your previous comments… When you have a chance can you list them for me? I think I need to do my share of reading before this trial begins. If you can, thanks in advance!

    Everyone: The grammar book shit was meant for John only, I think he called me a guy or something + I didn’t appreciate his smartass comments. I have a million typos and misspellings, so as to clarify my remark towards him – it was only meant for John (whoever the loser is).

    YeYo: What do you guys have on Flores Crew from Chicago? Anything good? I read somewhere they were young, inexperienced, and unsophisticated, why on earth would anyone the likes of El Chapo trust a bunch of kids from Chicago? Who did they report to? I’m highly interested.

    Michel: After rereading and thinking things over, I have to agree, it does appear to be a PR move.

    Donde esta el Gallo? Porque esta MIA? Se le estrania sus comentarios :)

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  88. Niether of them dealt directly with the Cartel del golfo or a Chapo this steming from an investigation that started with street gangs mainly the Latin King and Two-Sixers in Chicago they grew up in Pilsen basicly been a mexican neighboorhood since the 50s. This led them suposedly to the Flores brothers and there pipe line from Cali and Texas but misteriously ended there. There is no way in hell that they where soley in charge of moving metra tons neither they or the people working with them that also got indicted..There was a white guy and an arab that got busted as part of the so called crew which I thought was intresting l..Look common street guys like me and them have certain limits as to acess of certain quantities. Their dad was trafficker as well that might have helped who knows he aint indicted but you can only imagine what kinda conects the old man had if he facilitated this for his twin sons and he is from a particular state in Mexico that we all know. And I will leave it at that..I dont know them to a tee but we shared some girls in common and would frequent the same night clubs.I have got to belive that they where involved in trafficking but not to the extent they make it out to be..I can almost assure you that they had no direct contact with either cartel.But they where moving some kinda weight and their people where working directly with several of the bigger street gangs in Chicago.They could be labeled as the three things you heard but who isnt at the age of 28 and with money to spare.I think people like them come and go its a shame they didnt use their brains to operate in a legitimate way, they already owens two legit buisneses but, then again maybe they didnt really have the brains and judging by the times I hung around them they really werent the type of dealers you see on TV..Oh and “Flores Crew” would be what the feds call them not what they went by..It makes them seem more notorious to the general public thats why they come up with that stuff.I dont think they will serve for anything in Mayitos case.

    One thing to ask youself is where is the all the money from all these tons they moved??

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  89. @ Isabella….The last post was meant for your question..

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  90. [...] Calif. LocalSpur – News, Yellow Page Listings, Events and Local Tweets for Burbank, CA.“A Veces el Cielo Niega La Lluvia” – Border Reporter – News That Crossed The Lin…google_ad_client = "pub-2614176698336062"; /* 336×280,10-4-5 */ google_ad_slot = "8575887840"; [...]

  91. I’m asking because I can’t find them on the BOP (the government is protecting or hiding them for a reason) and I can’t make anything of the pleadings on Pacer, so I have a feeling that the Feds are going to try and make them out to be something their not. This crap that they were being courted by the Beltran-Leyva brothers (when the brothers were intact) and El Chapo y El Mayo at the sametime is just some bull shit story. There has to be more men involved, real men, not these boys. I just don’t see how they could be it. I was expecting a couple of big shots from Chicago.

    Thanks for the information by the way, I’m going to look into it some more, see what I find.

    I guess we’ll have to wait for the trial or a brady motion from Panzer and his team.

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  92. @Isabella
    The big shots in Chicago are protected ny their political contributions..It seems that when a case leads to them all of a sudden people start having amnesia..I dont know who they are but the have to be running some of the bigger legit buisneses in the city..There is alot of pay for play in Chicago with city contracts for minorities and alot of them are starting to crumble maybe somthing big will be revealed..Chicago is extra corrupt nothing like any other city in the US.

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  93. @ Tu Padre.

    Interesting artcile you posted. Having grown up next door in Trinity, all I can say is that there is alot of truth in whats said; but as well the old school non pot types still abound in both counties, the article only shows a limited side unfortunately.

    No doubt though that certain law enforcement personnel are going to lose their extra stipends if is legalized, and I wholheartedly agree that certain small growers will get squeezed out near instantaneously, they just don’t have their shit together.

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  94. This might be of intrest to some of you. Not really related to the content here, but still interesting to see what the U.S. is capable of.

    http://wikileaks.org/

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  95. I

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  96. want

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  97. to be the one

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  98. who makes

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  99. it

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  100. to 100

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  101. I did it, I did it, I feel so childish, but I did it!!!!!

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  102. Thanks for the link Nadien! I’m still reading….

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  103. Damn…it’s fun isn’t?

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  104. Whoa, wait, I scrolled down and didn’t see 95, 96, 97, 98, and 99.

    What is the ruling YeYo?

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  105. WTF!!!!! That is what I call a cheater Esmeralda!!! I would expect that from grimey ass Vincent Hanna but never you..I have to admit I am very disapointed in your actions..But on a good note I dont work tomorrow both my clients called off..woomp woomp..Viva Yo and the Corona in my hand!!! Y mi apa y la chona tambien..

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  106. Vincent you got punked!! That is wrong and it’s not right.

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  107. http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2010/04/20104782857326667.html
    re: wikileaks video

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  108. @
    Isabella

    Aqui ando Chula pero muy ocupado. No tengo tiempo ni de leer todos los pleitos.

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  109. Something new is shaking in Juarez. Five Thousand Federal Police are replacing the Mexican Army which is pulling out except patrol at border crossings and a few strategic locations so the articles say. I wonder what this is about? Maybe the people of Juarez finally screamed loud enough at Calderon that they were heard. Any ideas?

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  110. @Esmerelda, nice 100. I got the book yesturday. I sure like the way he set it up rotating 3 perspectives. As usually it will be great. I haven’t had much time to read much yet but when I start, it will not take long.

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  111. Who did this guy work for?????????????

    Xalisco, Nayarit – The Attorney General of the State of Nayarit confirmed the death of Jose Luis Estrada Martinez, “El Pepino” or “The Cucumber” a local drug trafficker, alleged leader of the plaza and the number of slain increased by twelve during confrontation between rival criminal groups early this Tuesday in the municipality of Xalisco.

    According to the latest police report the confrontation that arose at 00:45 hours on Tuesday in the towns of La Curva and San José de Costilla in the municipality of Xalisco left a total of twelve people dead, which included eight that were burnt inside a truck and four that were executed with gunshots.

    According to police sources among those executed is the father of José Luis Estrada Martínez “El Pepino,” and a woman along with her personal bodyguards.

    According to official statements from the authorities, the wife of the alleged local drug dealer was able to identify the body of her husband who was 38 years old and originally from the town of Ruiz, Nayarit.

    The identity of the alleged drug dealer was confirmed after locating a steel plate with 8 screws in the body, as well as bridge molar on the teeth.

    In the Forensic Medical Service of Nayarit managed to identify six of the twelve dead bodies.

    One of the deceased was identified as Juan Manuel Castañeda Correa. His body had a voter registration card in the pocket of his pants and the picture matched with the facial features of the now deceased.

    Another of the bodies was that of Pedro Luis Lopez Palomares, 19-year-old man from Villa Union, Sinaloa, who was identified by his mother.

    The fourth had the name of Francisco Javier López García, 35-year-old native and resident of this city of Tepic, Nayarit, who was identified by his sister.

    Another body was that of José Luciano Jasso Izar, a 31-year-old native and resident of this city of Tepic, who was identified by his wife who recognized a key ring in the left pocket of his burned trousers.

    The sixth that had not been burned was identified as Ismael Castañeda Correa, a native of San Pedro Analco, a municipality of Tequila, Jalisco adjacent to Tepic. He was identified by his wife.

    The attorney general also said that at least 10 vehicles were found at the scene with weapons inside.

    So far there are no suspects arrested for the killings.

    “Now, things are going to get ugly and heated in the palza,” said one of the agents assigned to the case investigating the slaughter in Xalisco, Nayarit

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  112. @
    Jrmafia

    Beltran-Leyva

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  113. I admit, I cheated, but hey, I still DID IT!!! I know noone would have expected that from me, thats what made it the most fun. T_R_C Thank You and the book is fantastic. I plan on writing a personal letter to that man, great writing, fascinating read. Hey Vincent, my lacking morals aside, you got to give it to me, right?

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  114. I’ve seen in the news the countless pictures of the dead bodies being positioned afterwards to send a message, here’s a case I believe that maybe as well:

    http://www.pbase.com/sixriversrail/image/117720101

    I took this picture last September. He was lying about forty to fifty feet away from the tracks. I wonder who the intended recipient of the message was.

    btw, not a troll, real persona.

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  115. @Jrmafia
    He use to work for Chapo/Beltrans when they where in tact..When they split he went with the Beltrans..He had the Plaza en Tepic but when el Tio got murked he tried to go back to Chapo..But you know that the Drug game in Mexico isnt the NBA you cant pancake around from team to team..Anyways I think before he died he was working for Chapo..As to who killed him fook who knows it could have been somone stronger trying to take the plaza on Chapos crew or it could have been some of the Beltrans people for betraying them.I heard we was getting weak and insecure and had secluded himself in some small town..They killed his dad and his wife along with him and some kids not sure if they where his.He was a rich kid gone wrong he came from a familiy with alot of money and somehow ended up in the dope game.Un compa me dijo!!

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  116. Gallo: Lo llame con el pensamiento. No hay tantos pleitos, al menos ninguno que cause risa. Bueno espero que este bien.

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  117. Correct me if I’m wrong, but is Esmerelda flirting with me?

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  118. @ Vincent Hanna
    Esmeralda says:
    “Hey Vincent, my lacking morals aside, you got to give it to me, right?”

    I hate to agree with you no disrespect to Esmeralda but some things translate better in person rather than in text..This is childish as well but, along with Vincent my mind went straight to the gutter for a split second then I realized what I was thinking..Vincent your a perv shame on you!!!…lol

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  119. @YeYo,

    Fue venganza por haber matado al hijo y otro familiar de Nacho Coronel.
    http://www.milenio.com/node/418762

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  120. youre talking about el tio from tijuana?

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  121. @Mario
    Thanks good shit bro!! Pinche 15 camionetas y 60 gueyes del Coronel..Pinshe jale ese se merese un corrido…I dont think Nacho will be seeing his son again.El compa le voy a poner unas cachetadas..lol..j/k..Well if Nachos people did murk him then he definatly aint workin with Chapo.Unless Nacjos kid and nephew where the ones sent to take the plaza away from the cuecumber and he got them before that.Pero quein sabe..Que se maten todos ala verga antes de Julio porke me voy de vacaciones a Durango por dos semanas y no quiero pedos…ha ha.

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  122. El tio Arturo BeltranLeyba le desian el Tio….. El Teo es El Tres letras but he looked more like Tres Tortas when he got hined up.

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  123. Tres Tortas hahaha, I have no idea what you were trying to say in your earlier post.

    Mario-

    What’s up with the raids in Tijuana?

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  124. los que le dieron piso al pepino fueron gente del H, no de nacho, pero el motivo si fue el mismo.

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  125. @ Vincent. Which One’s, the only raids I’ve known about is Adelitas, Hong Kong and other whore houses, the prostis were not up to date with their medical card…a couple of drug bust here and there, nothing big…

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  126. @ iLegal

    how could they be H’s people that carried this out for the motive of killing Nachito’s son? doesnt make sense if he’s on the opposing side, if Nacho did carry this out it could make Chapo and Mayo pretty nervous that this calm guy that nothing is said of him in the press or what not could be more brutal than any of them put together

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  127. CHAPO WINS JUAREZ

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/L/LT_DRUG_WAR_MEXICO?SITE=FLPEJ&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

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  128. @drift

    el “H” y with the help of el azul are consolidating all of barbas wealth and operations back with the family and those truly loyal….don’t be surprised if el cartel de pacifico sur becomes part of the federation…. osea va ver tregua….

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  129. el barbie rifaa..y el cartel de juarez se va juntar con el ingeniero de tijuana..the real no.1 de tj…el barbie nomas es pistolero ..but a very good one…

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  130. “osea va ver tregua”

    Osea they gave in.LOL.

    They always said that Hector was a lot more level headed and his retarded ass brother. Like they say if there is no chance in hell you can beat them join them.

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  131. [...] been clear for some time; from arrests like that of El Jabali last winter to the public relations campaign published by Proceso Magazine this week to the dissension within the Mexican Congress against what [...]

  132. there is no tregua, not that i know, it was something personal between nacho and H, el pepino agreed on giving up two of the guys who participated on nacho’s son murder, they went to the meeting, and el pepino and all his entourage got smoked, literally.

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  133. compa ilegal….

    exactamente…. el “H” no kiere mas pleitos y kien caliente el pedo se les va dar cuello…. la orden biene del cielo… el azul is a great consigliere lastima ke el arturo se hacia el sordo… me entiendes?

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  134. Why would anyone be dumb enough to kill nacho’s boy. When the Beltranes and Chapo went to war Mayo immediatly backed chapo. Viceroy did the beltranes. For the most part Nacho and Azul stayed neutral.

    Only two reasons to kill nacho’s boy.

    1.) Accident. Maybe pickle screwed up and got the wrong guy that is why H may have had him burned
    2.) To draw him out to fight. If H is making Nayarit his only plaza he may have wanted to send a message. Nacho is a sleeping giant hopefully for everyone’s sake this is just a rummor. We know what happens when you kill the son of a boss. (Edgar Guzman / The man with the hats kids)

    I agree tregua is in the works.

    H pulls out of mazatlan and stays in nayarit.
    Juarez goes to Chapo.. Viceroy deserves to loose it for crossing the federation anyway.
    TJ joins the federation.
    what about mexico city airport who gets that?
    Nacho’s boy getting smoked may be the Z trying to throw a wrench in all this.

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  135. http://narcotraficoenmexico.blogspot.com/2010/04/video-sobre-comando-armando-en-creel.html jajaj watch this video, it was in the border of sonora and chihuahua un the sierra, anyone recoginzes the dude doing blow in the navigator??? scarry shiaaaaat!!

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  136. What’s everyone’s take on the following?

    http://elblogdelnarco.blogspot.com/2010/04/al-buen-entendedor.html

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  137. so Mayo is saying the shotcaller is El Azul?

    El que quiere agua que le pida al cielo.

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    STA DE OCHUN Reply:

    I don’t think the guy in the picture is El Mayo nor Chapo. Why would el Mayo take a picture of himself and make it public…..if he is still in business…..so records can have an up-to-date description? Sounds illogical whichever way I see it. Chapo won’t even show his nose in public, nevertheless! If it was either Chapo or Mayo in the picture….I doubt they still look like that…

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