The Elephant and the Rabbit

Apr 2nd, 2010 | By Michel Marizco | Category: Chismes, General News
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THE BORDER REPORT

The family of the man arrested for the murders of people connected to the U.S. consulate was beaten and held captive by Mexican federal forces for two days before being dragged into the spotlight as a suspect, his family says. If true, it suggests a gross setup in a high-profile murder case that’s lingered on for weeks and is beginning to embarrass the law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border.

Talking to Diário de Juárez, Ricardo Valles de la Rosa’s wife says the Mexican Army picked him up Wednesday, March 24, beating him and planting a gun on him. She also says he was not a member of Los Aztecas but that he was indeed deported three years ago on immigration records from El Paso.

Hmm.

How’s that old joke go? Three teams of cops, Russian, American, and Mexican compete to see who can track down a rabbit first. The Russians and the Americans fail; the Mexicans drag in an elephant with a terrified look on his face. He’d obviously been beaten. “That’s no rabbit!” a judge yells. “Why of course it is,” says one of the Federales. “He confessed it to us!”

True or no? The case is bizarre. If you’ll recall, Valle was arrested after the FBI told the Mexicans who he was. That’s what the Mexican Army claimed anyway. The Americans have referred all reporter questions to the Mexicans, a move I find curious in this time of “unprecedented cooperation.” Curious but also illustrative if they know the Mexicans have the wrong guy. Remember that. It will be an important point later, once it disappears. If the Mexicans set the guy up, everybody will blame Mexico. That is to be expected. The Americans either helped the Mexicans pull the setup or they stayed quiet while it happened. That part won’t make it to the news.

Then there is the manner in which the announcement of Valles’ arrest was handled. Last Tuesday, Mexican officials specifically said Valles was not a suspect. Then they said they had a suspect in custody but wouldn’t say who. Then they charged Valles with acting as a lookout for the gunmen, following Lesley Enriquez and her husband, Arthur Redelfs in one SUV; Jorge Salcido and his children in a second. Yesterday, they publicly claimed, and they’ve said this before, that Redelfs was the target they were after because of the way he treated jail inmates in El Paso County.

Of course the family could be lying; I’ve noticed in all my time working on the border that the families of accused individuals rarely speak out, not unless they have a strong compulsion to do so. And the fact that the wife gives specific information on when the alleged levantón happened suggests a reasonable level of fact in her tale.

The fact that the Chihuahua Attorney General’s Office and the PGR have changed their stories on Valles’ arrest also suggests there is more going on here than what has been revealed. The Americans had a warrant for Valles out of El Paso County, a drug charge, don’t remember the specifics. The Mexicans have repeatedly stated it was the FBI’s work that led to their picking Valles up. The Americans haven’t negated this. If you’re going to engineer a fictional arrest, why arrest a man with a family who may speak out? Why arrest him in front of witnesses? That also makes no sense.

Did the Mexicans rush an investigation to calm the Americans down?

Did the Americans help the Mexicans fictionalize an arrest to calm everyone else down?

Is the family lying?

Was Valles really a lookout?

Was Redelfs really the target?

We shall see.

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123 comments
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  1. the U.S government wanted a responsible, now!, and the Mexican government gave it to them right away, the U.S government won’t like if the Mexicans dig pretty deep into this particular case because they could find out who the real killer was because they know it wasn’t a cartel member, and the Mexican government, as usual, won’t dig deeper anyways, they got “their” man, and as long as the gringos are happy, everything it’s cool, no matter if they got the wrong person, the gringos are pleased, and that’s what matters the most.

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  2. chivo expiatorio

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  3. I’m surprised they haven’t come up with any made up lies to discredit the wife’s allegations yet, very poor coverup by the Mexicans,at least they tried lol well they always do. A+ for effort

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  4. it wouldn’t surprise me if the wife dies in a freak accident, like, teared to pieces with a cuerno de chivo for instance.

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  5. I just got back from vacationing in the Desert South West. I have to say that I don’t miss the place. Arizona was so awesome when I was growing up. Not the same place I remember. Sad. I did, however, enjoy my two trips to Tucson. Biggest small town in the country. Good food! Last trip I’m making out there til my little man is born. Thanks to those who made my trip enjoyable.

    Damn, it is just too damn easy to become someones patsy these days. I mean, once those federales start shelling out a good old fashion calientada, any person would tell a great story. A lot of total bullshit is what I say. I’m not buying it. Great work Marizco. I don’t know what I’d do for entertainment without BR. Keep it up, Dude.

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  6. I asked an Mexican attorney one time, who was the biggetst organised crime opperator in Mexico? He said that’s easy, whoever the biggest law enforcement was. Then he said the second largest is whoever the second biggest law agency is. That has stuck with me ever since.

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  7. @ilegel. Yeah their not gonna let her talk like that for long, when she dies they r gonna go look for otro pobre pa echarle la culpa

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  8. asi es El Pato, that’s how they work, i’ve seen it with my own eyes, when they need a culpable, they find it, if not, they make it , and by the way, the title on this article, just beautiful, no need for any explanation…that’s why in Mexico, everybody help the narcos out, rather than help those fooking pigs.

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  9. Pigs? I confused… I thought narcos were dogs and cops were chickens…sorta like
    http://images.4chan.org/gif/src/1270231480278.gif

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  10. i’m talking a bout Mexico, narcos are what they are, cops are pigs and assholes.

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  11. Anti-Government “Guardians” Target Governors http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/04/02/national/main6356489.shtml

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  12. Michel,
    When American officials are harmed on the border, whether in Mexico or US, there seems to be a special button the American feds push, and voila!!…results ultimately happen. I have seen it before, and usually, whoever is arrested, extradited or killed outright is somehow involved. The results are not always “clean” results. The beatings and planting of a gun on Valles are probably true, or at least very believable. But Valles being somehow involved seems believable too, only because an unprecedented cooperation seems to take place between the USA and Mejico during events like this. By the way, I heard your Rabbit Joke a bit different, that during the protestations that the Mexican cops had actually captured a tortuga, the cops back-handed the turtle and demanded ?Que eres? and the turtle cowered and replied “Un conejo”. Either way, an oldie but goodie.

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  13. Prediction: When all of this dies down ( and believe it or not, it will) The Juarez Tourism industry will become larger than anything. Mexico will make a buck off anything, wait till tourists are flourishing to pay to see all these horrendous infamous places, stunned, but enthralled. (Sort of like now)

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  14. Thanks for the help, Michel. Here goes…

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  15. Esmeralda, that’s being happening already for quite some time now, it’s called “El Narco Tour”, people pay taxi drivers to take them to places in which they can see the gigantic narco houses, and the spots where some well known narcos were gunned down.

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  16. There’s a tour??? Damn capitalism!!! People have died, thousands of people, and Mexican government is willing to capitalise on everything that’s happening, when they too are also very responsible. This isn’t Alcatraz, people are still dying.

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  17. Drift, i wanted to do this a few years ago but a certain reporter who shall remain nameless talked me out of it…ok are you ready, here it is. Narco T-shirts, we sell them in the POE lines as people are waiting to cross back into the US. On the front something like “El Cartel de Sinaloa” on the back, a picture of the short guy, sell those from Mexicali all the way to Juarez, “El Cartel de Tijuana or AFO” on one side, Benny or his baby bro Ramon on the back and so on. Yeah, you’d get your head stompped in probably and that would be it, but at $10 a pop…Frank you can’t lose…and if I can’t pay them back you think Sosa is going to send me a bill? He’s going to send a freaking hit squad.

    Esmerelda, how you been sweetheart? Still look fine? Still doing your thing?

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  18. @Esmeralda…good to hear from you.

    I went to an Auto Zone in Juarez about 3 or 4 years ago where 3 cops were killed and 1 was taken hostage. I went 2 days after it happened. A very good friend that lives there took me to several places that day. It was a very sombering experience. It gave me information in living color about what it would be like for 4 black suburbans full of men with AK 47s to drive up and unload on everything in there way. There were 3 locations of distict bleed outs in the parking lot. The cinder block front of the building was pelted with bullet holes. The glass had been replaced but the metal doors and and mrtal window sills were not replaced. It was incredible to see how the bullets knarled the steel in the doors and sills. I counted 50 bullet holes in the cinder block. This happen when the business was opened.

    There was a cop present and when we walked in, he smiled and shook his head implying even he was shocked at the damage. Seriously, it was shocking. I spoke with one of the employees and he decribed the incident and showed me where he hid. This observation gave me a clear idea of how much force is used in some of these hits.

    Im not sure why I needed to tell this. I have been going to Juarez for years and I guess when you have friends that live there, the violence has to come out in conversation. Before the drug wars, my interest was the serial killings of women, and it still is however, there is very little reporting on that now. I have visited many of the obduction sites and places where the bodies were discarded. Doing this made the crimes more real and it gave me more insight about who did the crimes, “the police” in many cases.

    I haven’t given it much thought about this being a tourist attraction. I do believe it could be. Old Western shoot out locations have been big for years. If when peace does come, it could be very big. And if it happens, I hope the poor of Juarez that have endured the times reep their reward.

    Vincert, fiqure out how to market and sell the T shirts on this side and you will not have to watch your back so much.

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  19. Just like 2122 N Clark St. in Chicago. The site of the St. Valentines day Massacre. The building no longer exists, it’s just a little empty lot with grass and a wrought iron fence around it. I used to live 2 blocks from there and as I would walk by I would see tourists taking pictures of the lot. Death and destruction sell.

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  20. You wouldn’t have to market anything, the market is there, and those lines? You have a captive audience. It would be a fad, short life span though, 3 months tops. Then they’ll be like one of those “one tequila, two tequila, three tequila, floor.” Shirts you see on the strand in Galveston or South Padre Island.

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  21. When there is blood on the street’s, even if it is your own…buy real estate…

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  22. Heisenburg, I have to ask why? Remember, in Juarez 40 % of the homes are vacant, Im sure it available.

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  23. and by next Monday, more homes will be abandoned in el Valle de Juarez

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  24. And bloody too!

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  25. Are you kidding me? Mayo asked for an interview? That kind of tells me he is getting tired of this, or maybe he is in bad health and wants something on record before he dies.

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  26. It’s an old saying, it was also in “Inside Man” (a cool ass movie). If there are people dying on your street, they are dying for a reason, that reason is because of where they are ie. Gaza Strip, the land is so valuable to some people they will commit murder to get that land. Yes the homes are vacant yes they are run down, but to some people that land is very valuable…ie El Chapo.
    Watch that movie it will paint a better picture thean I have.

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  27. Illegal; Wow I did not know that, I actually hope the Cartels do get wind of this, maybe they can make there billions on a legitamate business, that is based on an illegitamate business. Vincent: Hey to you, Yep been doing my thing, like to keep up on this web site, so much to learn. T_R_C Would really like to correspond one on one with you , Could find picking your mind rather intriguing. Too All….Has anyone checked out Charles Bowdens book, Murder City? I found it a fantastic read. I wish that man was available, would love to pick his awesome mind too. What are those mansions going for these days in Juarez? The thought of capitalizing off of murder is awful, but if it would give Juarez a way to survive….well we will see.

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  28. @Move, where did you get that. I was beginning to think he would never speak out or be seen again. I always felt peace had to start with him or the long shot El Azul.

    @Esmerelda, Rabbit has my email address and I think he has yours. I give him permission to get that to you. We can start there. I would like that. I appreciate your wisdom.

    @Heisenberg, I figured it was something to do with folklore when I read your statement. It is probably true. Along the same lines, Confusous said (lol mispelled) where there is crisis, there is opportunity.

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  29. T_R_C: I wanted to ask the same question. But it’s possible and given the circumstances, the timing is eminent, if his son is going to trial in the next few months.

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  30. @T_R_C, Proceso by Julio Scherer Garcia.

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  31. http://www.proceso.com.mx/rv/modHome/detalleExclusiva/78067

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  32. @ Esmerelda

    I don’t remember if you have my E mail or not. rabbit85282@yahoo.com

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  33. Begining of the month. Time for donation. I hope the rest of you donate to this site. Mike Marizco works hard so the rest of us can mix ideas and argument. It would be a shame to lose this site someday because the creator has to make a living doing something else. This site deserves it and so does Michel.

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  34. @ Esmerelda. pokettenz@yahoo.com

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  35. la entrevista con el mayo, a ver quien la traduce porque yo tengo guevonada….Tenía interés en conocerlo”, le dijo el capo del cártel de Sinaloa, colega y compadre de “El Chapo” Guzmán. En el encuentro, que terminó en puntos suspensivos, El Mayo Zambada dejó un reto: “Me pueden agarrar en cualquier momento… o nunca”

    Un día de febrero recibí en Proceso un mensaje que ofrecía datos claros acerca de su veracidad. Anunciaba que Ismael Zambada deseaba conversar conmigo.
    La nota daba cuenta del sitio, la hora y el día en que una persona me conduciría al refugio del capo. No agregaba una palabra.
    A partir de ese día ya no me soltó el desasosiego. Sin embargo, en momento alguno pensé en un atentado contra mi persona. Me sé vulnerable y así he vivido. No tengo chofer, rechazo la protección y generalmente viajo solo, la suerte siempre de mi lado.
    La persistente inquietud tenía que ver con el trabajo periodístico. Inevitablemente debería contar las circunstancias y pormenores del viaje, pero no podría dejar indicios que llevaran a los persecutores del capo hasta su guarida. Recrearía tanto como me fuera posible la atmósfera del suceso y su verdad esencial, pero evitaría los datos que pudieran convertirme en un delator.
    Me hizo bien recordar a Octavio Paz, a quien alguna vez le oí decir, enfático como era:
    “Hasta el último latido del corazón, una vida puede rodar para siempre”.
    Una mañana de sol absoluto, mi acompañante y yo abordamos un taxi del que no tuve ni la menor idea del sitio al que nos conduciría. Tras un recorrido breve, subimos a un segundo automóvil, luego a un tercero y finalmente a un cuarto. Caminamos en seguida un rato largo hasta detenernos ante una fachada color claro. Una señora nos abrió la puerta y no tuve manera de mirarla. Tan pronto corrió el cerrojo, desapareció.
    La casa era de dos pisos, sólida. Por ahí había cinco cuadros, pájaros deformes en un cielo azuloso. En contraste, las paredes de las tres recámaras mostraban un frío abandono. En la sala habían sido acomodados sillones y sofás para unas diez personas y la mesa del comedor preveía seis comensales.
    Me asomé a la cocina y abrí el refrigerador, refulgente y vacío. La curiosidad me llevó a buscar algún teléfono y sólo advertí aparatos fijos para la comunicación interna. La recámara que me fue asignada tenía al centro una cama estrecha y un buró de tres cajones polvosos. El colchón, sin sábana que lo cubriera, exhibía la pobreza de un cobertor viejo. Probé el agua de la regadera, fría y en el lavamanos vi cuatro botellas de Bonafont y un jabón usado.
    Hambrientos, el mensajero y yo salimos a la calle para comer, beber lo que fuera y estirar las piernas. Caminamos sin rumbo hasta una fonda grata, la música a un razonable volumen. Hablamos sin conversar, las frases cortadas sin alusión alguna a Zambada, al narco, la inseguridad, el ejército que patrullaba las zonas periféricas de la ciudad.
    Volvimos a la casa desolada ya noche. Nos levantaríamos a las siete de la mañana. A las ocho del día siguiente desayunamos en un restaurante como hay muchos. Yo evitaba cualquier expresión que pudiera interpretarse como un signo de impaciencia o inquietud, incluso la mirada insistente a los ojos, una forma de la interrogación profunda. El tiempo se estiraba, indolente y comíamos con lentitud.
    Las horas siguientes transcurrieron entre las cuatro paredes ya conocidas. Yo llevaba conmigo un libro y me sumergí en la lectura, a medias. Mi acompañante parecía haber nacido para el aislamiento. Como si nada existiera a su alrededor, llegué a pensar que él mismo pudiera haber desaparecido sin darse cuenta, sin advertirlo. Me duele escribir que no tenía más vida que la servidumbre, la existencia sin otro horizonte que el minuto que viene.
    “Ya nos avisarán”, me dijo sorpresivamente, “la llamada vendrá por el celular”.
    Pasó un tiempo informe, sin manecillas. ‘Paciencia’, me decía.
    Salimos al fin a la oscuridad de la noche. En unas horas se cruzarían el ocaso y el amanecer sin luz ni sombra, quieto el mundo.
    Viajamos en una camioneta, seguidos de otra. La segunda desapareció de pronto y ocupó su lugar una tercera. Nos seguía, constante, a cien metros de distancia. Yo sentía la soledad y el silencio en un paisaje de planicies y montañas.
    Por veredas y caminos sinuosos ascendimos una cuesta y de un instante a otro el universo entero dio un vuelco. Sobre una superficie de tierra apisonada y bajo un techo de troncos y bejucos, habíamos llegado al refugio del capo, cotizada su cabeza en millones de dólares, famoso como “El Chapo” y poderoso como el colombiano Escobar, en sus días de auge zar de la droga.
    Ismael Zambada me recibió con la mano dispuesta al saludo y unas palabras de bienvenida:

    –Tenía mucho interés en conocerlo.
    –Muchas gracias–, respondí con naturalidad.

    Me encontraba en una construcción rústica de dos recámaras y dos baños, según pude comprobar en los minutos que me pude apartar del capo para lavarme. Al exterior había una mesa de madera tosca para seis comensales y bajo un árbol que parecía un bosque, tres sillas mecedoras con una pequeña mesa al centro. Me quedó claro que el cobertizo había sido levantado con el propósito de que el capo y su gente pudieran abandonarlo al primer signo de alarma. Percibí un pequeño grupo de hombres juramentados.
    A corta distancia del narco, los guardaespaldas iban y venían, a veces los ojos en el jefe y a ratos en el panorama inmenso que se extendía a su alrededor. Todos cargaban su pistola y algunos, además, armas largas. Dueño de mí mismo, pero nervioso, vi en el suelo un arma negra que brillaba intensamente bajo un sol vertical. Me dije, deliberadamente forzada la imagen: podría tratarse de un animal sanguinario que dormita.
    –Lo esperaba para que almorzáramos juntos–, me dijo Zambada y señaló la silla que ocuparía, ambos de frente.
    Observé de reojo a su emisario, las mandíbulas apretadas. Me pedía que no fuera a decir que ya habíamos desayunado.
    Al instante fuimos servidos con vasos de jugo de naranja y vasos de leche, carne, frijoles, tostadas, quesos que se desmoronaban entre los dedos o derretían en el paladar, café azucarado.
    –Traigo conmigo una grabadora electrónica con juego para muchas horas–, aventuré con el propósito de ir creando un ambiente para la entrevista.
    –Platiquemos primero.

    Le pregunté al capo por Vicente, Vicentillo.
    –Es mi primogénito, el primero de cinco. Le digo “Mijo”. También es mi compadre.
    Zambada siguió en la reseña personal:
    –Tengo a mi esposa, cinco mujeres, quince nietos y un bisnieto. Ellas, las seis, están aquí, en los ranchos, hijas del monte, como yo. El monte es mi casa, mi familia, mi protección, mi tierra, el agua que bebo. La tierra siempre es buena, el cielo no.
    –No le entiendo.
    –A veces el cielo niega la lluvia.
    Hubo un silencio que aproveché de la única manera que me fue posible:
    –¿Y Vicente?
    –Por ahora no quiero hablar de él. No sé si está en Chicago o Nueva York. Sé que estuvo en Matamoros.
    –He de preguntarle, soy lo que soy. A propósito de su hijo, ¿vive usted su extradición con remordimientos que lo destrocen en su amor de padre?
    –Hoy no voy a hablar de “Mijo”. Lo lloro.
    –¿Grabamos?
    Silencio.
    –Tengo muchas preguntas–, insistí ya debilitado.
    –Otro día. Tiene mi palabra.
    Lo observaba. Sobrepasa el 1.80 de estatura y posee un cuerpo como una fortaleza, más allá de una barriga apenas pronunciada. Viste una camisa verde cerrada al cuello y sus pantalones de mezclilla azul mantienen la línea recta de la ropa bien planchada. Se cubre con una gorra y el bigote recortado es de los que sugieren una sutil y permanente ironía.
    –He leído sus libros y usted no miente–, me dice.
    Detengo la mirada en el capo, los labios cerrados.
    –Todos mienten, hasta Proceso. Su revista es la primera, informa más que todos, pero también miente.
    –Señáleme un caso.
    –Reseñó un matrimonio que no existió.
    –¿El del Chapo Guzmán?
    –Dio hasta pormenores de la boda.
    –Sandra Ávila cuenta de una fiesta a la que ella concurrió y en la que estuvo presente “El Chapo”.
    –Supe de la fiesta, pero fue una excepción en la vida del “Chapo”. Si él se exhibiera o yo lo hiciera, ya nos habrían agarrado.
    –¿Algunas veces ha sentido cerca al Ejército?
    –Cuatro veces. “El Chapo” más.
    –¿Qué tan cerca?
    –Arriba, sobre mi cabeza. Huí por el monte, del que conozco los ramajes, los arroyos, las piedras, todo. A mí me agarran si me estoy quieto o me descuido, como al Chapo. Para que hoy pudiéramos reunirnos, vine de lejos. Y en cuanto terminemos, me voy.
    –¿Teme que lo agarren?
    –Tengo pánico de que me encierren.
    –Si lo agarraran, ¿terminaría con su vida?
    –No sé si tuviera los arrestos para matarme. Quiero pensar que sí, que me mataría.
    Advierto que el capo cuida las palabras. Empleó el término arrestos, no el vocablo clásico que naturalmente habría esperado.
    Zambada lleva el monte en el cuerpo, pero posee su propio encierro. Sus hijos, sus familias, sus nietos, los amigos de los hijos y los nietos, a todos les gustan las fiestas. Se reúnen con frecuencia en discos, en lugares públicos y el capo no puede acompañarlos. Me dice que para él no son los cumpleaños, las celebraciones en los santos, pasteles para los niños, la alegría de los quince años, la música, el baile.
    –¿Hay en usted espacio para la tranquilidad?
    –Cargo miedo.
    –¿Todo el tiempo?
    –Todo.
    –¿Lo atraparán, finalmente?
    –En cualquier momento o nunca.
    Zambada tiene sesenta años y se inició en el narco a los dieciséis. Han transcurrido cuarenta y cuatro años que le dan una gran ventaja sobre sus persecutores de hoy. Sabe esconderse, sabe huir y se tiene por muy querido entre los hombres y las mujeres donde medio vive y medio muere a salto de mata.
    –Hasta hoy no ha aparecido por ahí un traidor–, expresa de pronto para sí. Lo imagino insondable.
    –¿Cómo se inició en el narco?
    Su respuesta me hace sonreír.
    –Nomás.
    –¿Nomás?
    Vuelvo a preguntar:
    –¿Nomás?
    Vuelve a responder:
    –Nomás.
    Por ahí no sigue el diálogo y me atengo a mis propias ideas: el narcotráfico como un imán irresistible y despiadado que persigue el dinero, el poder, los yates, los aviones, las mujeres propias y ajenas con las residencias y los edificios, las joyas como cuentas de colores para jugar, el impulso brutal que lleve a la cúspide. En la capacidad del narcotráfico existe, ya sin horizonte y aterradora, la capacidad para triturar.
    Zambada no objeta la persecución que el gobierno emprende para capturarlo. Está en su derecho y es su deber. Sin embargo, rechaza las acciones bárbaras del ejército.
    Los soldados, dice, rompen puertas y ventanas, penetran en la intimidad de las casas, siembran y esparcen el terror. En la guerra desatada encuentran inmediata respuesta a sus acometidas. El resultado es el número de víctimas que crece incesante. Los capos están en la mira, aunque ya no son las figuras únicas de otros tiempos.
    –¿Qué son entonces?–, pregunto.
    Responde Zambada con un ejemplo fantasioso:
    –Un día decido entregarme al gobierno para que me fusile. Mi caso debe ser ejemplar, un escarmiento para todos. Me fusilan y estalla la euforia. Pero al cabo de los días vamos sabiendo que nada cambió.
    –¿Nada, caído el capo?
    –El problema del narco envuelve a millones. ¿Cómo dominarlos? En cuanto a los capos, encerrados, muertos o extraditados, sus reemplazos ya andan por ahí.
    A juicio de Zambada, el gobierno llegó tarde a esta lucha y no hay quien pueda resolver en días problemas generados por años. Infiltrado el gobierno desde abajo, el tiempo hizo su “trabajo” en el corazón del sistema y la corrupción se arraigó en el país. Al Presidente, además, lo engañan sus colaboradores. Son embusteros y le informan de avances, que no se dan, en esta guerra perdida.
    –¿Por qué perdida?
    –El narco está en la sociedad, arraigado como la corrupción.
    –Y usted, ¿qué hace ahora?
    –Yo me dedico a la agricultura y a la ganadería, pero si puedo hacer un negocio en los Estados Unidos, lo hago.
    Yo pretendía indagar acerca de la fortuna del capo y opté por valerme de la revista “Forbes” para introducir el tema en la conversación.
    Lo vi a los ojos, disimulado un ánimo ansioso:
    –¿Sabía usted que “Forbes” incluye al Chapo entre los grandes millonarios del mundo?
    –Son tonterías.
    Tenía en los labios la pregunta que seguiría, ahora superflua, pero ya no pude contenerla.
    –¿Podría usted figurar en la lista de la revista?
    –Ya le dije. Son tonterías.
    –Es conocida su amistad con “El Chapo” Guzmán y no podría llamar la atención que usted lo esperara fuera de la cárcel de Puente Grande el día de la evasión. ¿Podría contarme de qué manera vivió esa historia?
    –”El Chapo” Guzmán y yo somos amigos, compadres y nos hablamos por teléfono con frecuencia. Pero esa historia no existió. Es una mentira más que me cuelgan. Como la invención de que yo planeaba un atentado contra el Presidente de la República. No se me ocurriría.
    –Zulema Hernández, mujer d “El Chapo”, me habló de la corrupción que imperaba en Puente Grande y de qué manera esa corrupción facilitó la fuga de su amante. ¿Tiene usted noticia acerca de los acontecimientos de ese día y cómo se fueron desarrollando?
    –Yo sé que no hubo sangre, un solo muerto. Lo demás, lo desconozco.
    Inesperada su pregunta, Zambada me sorprende:
    –¿Usted se interesa por el Chapo?
    –Sí, claro.
    –¿Querría verlo?
    –Yo lo vine a ver a usted.
    –¿Le gustaría…?
    –Por supuesto.
    –Voy a llamarlo y a lo mejor lo ve.
    La conversación llega a su fin. Zambada, de pie, camina bajo la plenitud del sol y nuevamente me sorprende:
    –¿Nos tomamos una foto?
    Sentí un calor interno, absolutamente explicable. La foto probaba la veracidad del encuentro con el capo.
    Zambada llamó a uno de sus guardaespaldas y le pidió un sombrero. Se lo puso, blanco, finísimo.
    –¿Cómo ve?
    –El sombrero es tan llamativo que le resta personalidad.
    –¿Entonces con la gorra?
    –Me parece.
    El guardaespaldas apuntó con la cámara y disparó.

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  36. No bullshit illegal..I was about to post the same thing..lol..Sombody tagged me on FB with a picture and the interview.

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  37. BTW..That interview sucks…I know there has to be more to it fooken Scherer is holding back on us I could have thought of a millon better questions to ask this Mayo..He was all hung up on Chapo and Mayito and didnt get to ask him good shit like specifics about the 4 times..If he enjoys the corridos about him or does he prefer they keep quite.Something to better understand the personality of a druglord..Tiene 6 viejas el perro.His wife and 5 others well atleast we know he is a poligamist.

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  38. Thank You Rabbit and T_R_C….will email to you soon. By the way, hope everyone is having a Nice Easter. As to being a polygamist YeYo, the thought of living in the same house with 5 other women, is SCAREY

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  39. at 60, el mayo must have found the fountain of youth, lol!!! money that is.

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  40. Awwww, YeYo got blocked, sucks doesn’t it???…see ya @ 100 biatch…

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  41. @ Esmeralda
    Yeah it must be tuff being a billionaire druglord with 6 women under the same roof..lol. Some women cant be around other women without hating on the rest of them or sabatoging somthing in order to make themselfs feel better.This guy should have dugg deeper into that subjuct..I mean do you satisfy them all at once or do they have assinged days??..ha ha..The thought of it is driving me crazy.
    @Vincent Hanna Montana…J/K
    illegal stole my thunder on that one..Kinda reminds me of somthing..hhmm… Oh yeah dont cheat this time…ha ha..Biatch..

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  42. Ilegal: Thanks for posting the article. Do you have the link to the article? I’d like to use it as reference.

    Esmeralda & YeYo: Guys, I think he was referring to his daughters: “Tengo a mi esposa, cinco mujeres, quince nietos y un bisnieto. Ellas, las seis, están aquí, en los ranchos, hijas del monte, como yo. El monte es mi casa, mi familia, mi protección, mi tierra, el agua que bebo. La tierra siempre es buena, el cielo no.”

    I’m pretty sure he was referring to all of his daughters.

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  43. Great post illegal I think its a coded messege that he wants to get out to All of his people including his son. I don’t know why but its a gut feeling , then again it might be all the enchiladas I ate lol. I say we make this past the 100 comment mark guys!

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  44. here’s the link to the interview, http://www.noroeste.com.mx/publicaciones.php?id=570679

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  45. @Isabella
    It could be true..Its not uncommen that some of these big guys have several women under one roof..I know a guy named Ruperto Ruacho who operates in the northern part of the state of Durango for Chapo and he has 4 to 5 wifes and..Yeah he might be talkin about his daughters.Thats why this reporter should have dugg deeper..ha ha..Now he has us here guessing wether it his companions or his daughters…I say companions or maybe sub conciously I want 6 extra women traveling with me to secluded 2 bedroom homes in the Mountains. Maybe somone that is familiar with his situation and knows how many children are in the Zambada-Niebla family.

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    ecorr1980 Reply:

    How did you know ruperto ruacho? are you from the same area?? Did you know him personally?

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  46. YEYO, if i wanted to steal your (or anyone’s) thunder on this one, i would have posted the interview in good old English, which i just finished translating five minutes ago by the way, but i’m not gonna do it.

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  47. Well don;t forget, these ARE men of God. It would be wrong to live in sin with them

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  48. but we only live one time, and we all gonna die anyways, so…

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  49. I’ve ridden a fully loaded Touring Bike (a mountain bike/bicycle with saddlebags) thousands of miles in Mexico. The main highways are psychotic, the secondary highways are great, but the dirt-roads are by far the best, as far as riding a bicycle goes. Mexico still has towns that are accessible only by dirt, something nearly impossible to find in the U.S.

    While this is super-fun, sometimes in the back-country we’ve found ourselves in the middle of some bad shit going down and people from both sides have questioned what the hell we were doing there. The CIA and DEA were long ago rightly prohibited from passing themselves off as tourists, but there has still been times when our motives have been questioned. Being a dumb-ass and hauling (and offering) a bunch of hot beer almost always results in either side driving off laughing.

    The Black SUV’s hauling ass never stop.

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  50. Halfway there slut’s…

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  51. @yeyo, Uve gone all the way up to El conejo?? Great Machaca at Buenos Aires!

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  52. I think there may be another son, he appears to be in his 20s. I wonder when the interview took place, because he states that he’s not sure if his son is in New York or Chicago, at this moment he should be more than certain that he’s in Chicago, because a family member (an aunt) attended his arraignment on February 23rd. And he has a status hearing coming up on April 21st, so we’ll see who attends that hearing and who the other defense attorney will be. They mentioned something about hiring someone from Chicago. What I’d like for Panzer to do is to quiet down the media a little, because during the trial he won’t be able to say anything at all. But he knows what he’s doing I guess.

    Just for kicks, let’s not blame the men for their transgressions, because if we’re going to play that game, let’s also add the women who put up that kind of sketchy shit and the women who serve themselves on a silver platter to married men. My boss has been cheating on his wife with the same woman for the past 25 years (or perhaps more than 25 years), by now I would have left his ass and kidnapped his six dogs (he cares more about the dogs than anything else). But she’s hasn’t for comfort I guess, but as miserable as she is, it’s her fault for staying with him.

    I hope everyone is okay, apparently there was an earthquake in Mexico and it was felt in California and Arizona.

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  53. I just got Ilegal’s link. Thank you!

    The date of the article is April 4th, but I think the interview would have taken place prior to February 23rd, because at that point Vicente Zambada-Niebla was already in the U.S., but was still being transferred to Chicago. So he must have known that he was heading to Chicago or New York, I wonder what’s going on in New York, I doubt they can put together an indictment up there too. They (the U.S Dept. of Justice) were lucky enough with the Flores family in Chicago, but NY?

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  54. Guilty or not of these crimes, this bastard is clearly paying for every horrible deed he’s done in the past! If it acts like a f’n duck, it’s a f’n duck!! And if you’re so concerned with pinpointing “the real” killers, why don’t you initiate your own investigation? Have you obtained any information that will lead us to believe otherwise!? Or, are you a typical conspiracy theorist who’s trying your hardest to believe these a-holes are much to bright to be apprehended by authorities!?!

    C’mon, Dude! They cleaned up some trash off the street!! The same trash that wouldn’t think twice about causing harm to your or my family!! Why can’t we congratulate them on that!?

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  55. @everybody
    I think I had an ephiphnay last night…lol..I think the point Mayo was tryin to make was that yes he is scared to get cought but would it really matter if he did get cought like he stated there is others already waiting for him.
    Overall I think it was a good PR move because he seemed very humble alot of Mexico can relate to the rural folk in the mountain area because they are the underdogs taking on the big bad goverment that has robbed their own people for centuries.

    @El Pato
    I been there a few times its fooken beautiful up there as far as terrain.Its the steriotypical drug town in Mexico where 13yr olds are running around with guns and have check points set up all over the area..I went once in August shit was even hotter cause the buds where starting to flower.I seen Ruperto alot of times his sister is married to one of my uncles and lives in a town in between Sta Maria and Tepehuanes donde empieza La sierra..When I was about 11 yrs old I saw him kill some dude bogus as hell he was aiming for another dude from like 100 yds away and missed and shot some indito that was behind him..Its not uncommon to drive threw a certain town in August and find no males in the town all females then if you ask around the will be like ” anda arriba trabajando con Ruperton” lol..I used to always wonder how dude could just kill and kill mofos everywhere one time he got into a shoot out in La Posta de Jigutes con los Soldados and they made those guachos flee the area I remenber they found dead guachos everywhere some off them came back into town begging for a refuge..My Mom is from Las Iglesias by that side of La Sierra a place called el Ranchito but the fam now resides in the St Mary of Gold region,so we got fam up in them Mts.

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  56. La Pura Neta: I don’t know if you were referring to my comment, but assuming you are, here’s my response:

    My comment was based on the article that was posted earlier, I was simply thinking up a timeline as to when the interview took place, given what has transpired in his son’s federal case, which is nothing really – just an arraignment and the scheduling of a status hearing for pre-trial motions.

    I think I mentioned something about the duck theory – it’s exhausted and overused. It would be the same as calling a Hispanic American (born in the U.S.) an illegal immigrant and an African American a criminal who lives off food stamps and has 20 kids. It’s the type of line that people use when they don’t want to do any thinking. And I’m big on thinking, it’s my only viable source. I don’t allow any government entity do my thinking for me. They’ve done a hell of a job with ICE, don you agree? (In case you missed the sarcasm, it’s there, it’s all there).

    Zambada-Garcia is paying for all of his “sins” with his flesh and blood. As for Guzman-Loera, he already gave up one son. High price to pay, do you think? And as Zambada-Garcia stated in the interview, “I am what I am… Nothing will change if I’m not here.” The Mexican government doesn’t care about cleaning up trash and the U.S. government could care less. You don’t ask yourself why this hasn’t ended years ago? Why didn’t the government intervene sooner?

    I wouldn’t put my family at risk (perhaps, something El Mayo should have learned), under any circumstances, and I would defend them with every ounce of my being. And if I had to give up my heart for my son, I would.

    The U.S. government doesn’t worry about my safety or my family’s safety – I do that. And I like to think I do a good job.

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  57. @Isabella
    You mentioned an aunt being at his trial..What do you know about this lady?? Who is paying for his lawyers??If his aunt is at the trial could this be a way to trace Mayo and his wearabouts cause I am sure she is relaying info to somone down there who is passing this info on too the man himself.I would bet that they have money laundered threw some legitimit buisness whereever she lives..If she lives in Chicago I wonder what kinda buisness they run.

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  58. Relax….. I’m in tight with Sosa.

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  59. @ yeyo, Ive always heard of El R1 because most of my family resides in a neighboring ranch, things were peaceful before so I guess he’s an allright Guy, crazy how the “zetas” or men claiming to be them made it all the way to El conejo and killed his son, or so I read. El Mayo said “..en cualquer momento o nunca..” he’s basically taunting those that want to lock him up, I’m pretty sure with the money he has that he wont be apprehended in a long time lol. If I was a billionaire I would bring in a new stock of women every month lol.

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  60. yeyo a ti que te valga verga lo que tiene el senor alla en chicago eres un pinchi envidioso hablas mucho
    chi cholito de quinta

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  61. /\
    / \
    ||
    DON’T FEED THE TROLL!

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  62. yeyo, el vicentillo’s lawyes can be paid off with money from LECHERA SANTA MONICA, that’s one of mayo’s legitimate and oldest businesses that’s hasn’t being mentioned in the fed’s investigations.

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  63. YeYo: Lets not go overboard and incriminate/implicate his aunt. She was probably there to support her nephew, I really doubt she’s signing any checks to his defense team, and quite frankly I would prefer that he’s footing the bill for his own defense and not us tax payers. We should also keep in mind that he’s in federal custody in a country where he doesn’t even understand the language spoken in the courtroom, any kind of support from his family will help him get through it.

    El Cardian: YeYo no estaba hablando nada malo, ni es envidioso, sólo hizo una pregunta. Y cuando lo dices asi suena un poco sospechoso. Me estas rematando la defensa en el blog. Todo se aclara en la corte, eso es lo mas importante, que todo salga bien en la corte en Chicago.

    The following is the article I read, courtesy of the Chicago Sun Times, where it states details about the family members present at the hearing:

    Alleged Sinaloa drug cartel leader denies Chicago charges
    Tue, 23 Feb 2010 04:00
    By NATASHA KORECKI Federal Courts Reporter/nkorecki@suntimes.com

    A man described by authorities as a high-ranking leader of Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel pleaded not guilty today in federal court in Chicago to wide-spread drug conspiracy charges that accuse him and others of bringing massive amounts of cocaine and heroin in to Chicago.

    Jesus Vicente Zambada-Niebla, 34, was charged in what authorities have called the largest international narcotics conspiracy case in the city’s history.

    His extradition to Chicago was described as one of the most significant extraditions from Mexico in years.

    A small contingent of family members also showed up for his court hearing. An aunt sobbed into her scarf after the hearing. Her eyes welling up, she put up her hand and shook her head when asked what she thought about the charges.

    The case is before U.S. District Judge Ruben Castillo.

    Zambada-Niebla was indicted last August with his father, Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada-Garcia, and Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman-Loera, who are both accused of directing factions of the Sinaloa cartel.

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  64. The interview says he was wearing a green shirt and the photo reveals a brown one.

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  65. I say send the Army, Delta Force, Navy SEAL’s, & ALL Special Forces to the Border & lets defend America & it’s people from the aliens & drug smugglers for once. Things are so out of hand. And it’s obvious the Mexican military is too weak & incompetent to stop the untrained drug cartels. And the Mexico government is too corrupt to bat an eye. The US needs to worry about Mexico a lot more than Iran & North Korea. The most dangerous, ruthless, & violent country in the world borders the US from the South. We need to send troops to Mexico & lynch all of the cartels once & for all!

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/04/05/border-fence-renewed-rancher-killing/

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  66. Check this out.

    It has more one more picture of Mayo and talks about his power. Also talks about the Narcopoliticos in Sanaloa.

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/29392932/Proceso-Edicion-Num-1744

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  67. wasnt there a news report saying chapo will be caught in 90 days? i dont get as into why Mayo would do an interview, maybe its a strategic move against chapo and his family will be pulled out of the drug trade if he gives up the most wanted man in the world next to Bin Laden. I mean think about it, your son gets caught, your business’s are already marked, Vincetillo has to give up 500 million, you feel all the pressure about all the violence, maybe this guy is tired of it all now and feels like hey ill give you chapo let me and my family out of the business and let me have my money and sons freedom

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  68. @El Cardian
    A ti que te valga verga guey si digo algo es porke tengo los huevos pa sostenerlo y si quieres calar nomas dime onde nos vemos guey pake conoscas a tu padre..Envidia a quien guey yo nunca dije nada en manera que representara envidia, a la mejor si se me antojan 6 viejas a la misma ves y si no te gusta de todos modos me la pelas.
    @illegal
    Very true the hole drug dealer thing blocked of the fact that they do have some legitamit buisneses (washer machines)..But yeah they probablly aint mentioned in the indictment but it is kinda neat to think that the guy has fam overhere that cares about the trial so much as to start crying for the dude..It makes me wonder how close they are to big Mayo.It was just a thought nothing more.
    @isabella
    Dang girl you follow that trial religiously you got all the dirt on that subject.
    @El Pato
    Yeah they got all the way up there they killed his daughter and one of his wifes too…There was rumored to be over 30 bodys that where picked up and hidden before the law showed up…The zetas dudes got alot off pull cause the presidente de Tepe rolls with them and hates R1 for some reason..From what I hear..I heard R1 got cut off by his sponsors and is in Aurora right now..but thats just he said she said shit..He has alot of money from his lodging buisness and he owns alot of land in that area I think he can make it with out the mota.

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  69. You expect me to believe that Omar Suarez was a stoolie…becasue Sosa says so?

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  70. this is your day off, brah, isn’t it, lol!!!

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  71. you calling me a liar?

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  72. Aside from the obvious fact that “Dude Love” watches too many movies, I abhor how he is blind to the root of the problem: the american addict. The problem starts in the U.S..

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  73. Funny a guy named Dude Love wants to go lynch people in other countrys…BTW Dude Love was one of my favorites of all time good ole Mick Foley.

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  74. Enamorado: I agree. If it’s not cocaine, weed or meth, it’s adderall and other prescription drugs, simply because people can’t cope with life. And honestly, I don’t care what people do in the privacy of their homes, that’s their business. What bother’s me is when society blinds itself to the truth and to reality, for instance, if people wouldn’t buy, no one would sell anything.

    A close family member of mine has serious issues with drugs and alcohol and it’s been a gradual thing since he was in middle school, it breaks my heart. I feel responsible, like I should have done something to stop it early on, but I’m only 4 years older and I could never control him. At this point it’s no longer harmless or for recreational purposes only, it’s out of spite and pain. I can’t blame anyone outside our family, I can’t blame his drug dealers or his stupid friends (who often provide whatever he needs). I blame his parents and now that he’s an adult, I blame him. As much as it breaks my heart, he’s responsible for his own actions. It’s a sobering experience watching someone you love deal with self-inflicted turmoil. I wouldn’t wish that kind of painful experience on my worst enemy.

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  75. I guess The Associated Press is with with you guys on El Mayo’s alleged “harem.”

    Magazine interview: Mexican druglord fears jail
    By ALEXANDRA OLSON (AP) – 22 hours ago

    MEXICO CITY — One of Mexico’s most famous drug lords said in a rare interview published Sunday that he lives in fear of getting caught and believes the military has closed in on him four times.

    “I’m terrified of being incarcerated,” Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada told the Mexican news magazine, Proceso, adding that he would even contemplate suicide if he was about to be caught. “I’d like to think that yes, I would kill myself.”

    Zambada and Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, who authorities say control the Sinaloa cartel, are Mexico’s two most-notorious fugitives, with a $2 million reward offered for information on their whereabouts.

    Zambada offered to meet with Proceso founder Julio Scherer, saying he always wanted to meet the journalist. He gave specific directions on when and where the interview would take place, the publication said.

    The magazine offered no other explanation of why a kingpin would give an interview after a lifetime on the run. It is almost unheard for Mexican drug suspects to speak to the media while still free.

    The offices of Calderon and the Attorney General said there would be no immediate comment on the interview.

    The magazine published the interview along with an outdoor photograph of Scherer with the mustachioed Zambada, who wore a baseball cap that cast a shadow over his eyes and had his arm around the journalist. Only brush can be seen in the background.

    Zambada said he had felt the army closing in on him four times and that soldiers had gotten close to Guzman even more often.

    “I fled into the countryside. I know the vegetation, the rivers, the rocks, everything,” Zambada said. “I’ll get caught if I get complacent, careless, just like El Chapo.”

    But he insisted that the drug trade would continue unabated even if he was arrested.

    “When it comes to the capos, jailed, dead or extradited — their replacements are ready,” Zambada said.

    Guzman, who escaped prison by hiding in a laundry truck nearly a decade ago, has made Forbes magazine’s lists of wealthiest and most-powerful people.

    “El Chapo Guzman and I are friends and we talk on the phone a lot,” Zambada said. He even said he might try to arrange an interview between Guzman and Proceso.

    Mexican officials blame the Sinaloa cartel for much of the country’s staggering bloodshed. Drug violence has killed more than 18,000 people since President Felipe Calderon took office in 2006, and has made the border city of Ciudad Juarez, where Sinaloa is fighting a turf battle against the Juarez cartel, one of the world’s most dangerous cities.

    The interview comes as Zambada’s son, Jesus Vicente Zambada-Niebla, faces trial in Chicago on charges that he conspired to import and sell large amounts of cocaine and heroin in the United States. Zambada-Niebla, who has pleaded not guilty, was arrested last year in Mexico City and was extradited to the United States in February.

    The U.S. indictment accuses both Ismael Zambada and his son of using planes, boats, trucks and cars to move nearly $50 million worth of cocaine from Colombia to New York, New Jersey, Chicago and California between August 2001 and June 2002.

    In the interview, Zambada refused to answer questions about his son, saying only that he “cries for him.”

    In November, a nephew of Zambada, Jesus Zambada Reyes, who had been cooperating with authorities, was found dead in a house in Mexico City in an apparent suicide. Zambada Reyes had been captured in 2008 and accused of smuggling cocaine through Mexico City airports.

    Scherer said he and someone sent to accompany him took four cars to a sparsely furnished house where they spent the night. The next evening, he took a long car ride through the mountains until he reached a rustic, two-room house where he met Zambada.

    Zambada revealed no details about his alleged criminal activities, but offered some insight into his personal life. He said Zambada-Niebla was the oldest of his five children, and that he has five grandchildren and a great-grandson.

    He said he had a wife and five mistresses.

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  76. Umm… Mr. Marizco, if you don’t mind me asking, why aren’t you making calls to obtain an exclusive interview with the other Sinaloa poster boy?

    I’m sure El Chapo has a couple of iphones, a laptop and he probably knows how to use ichat. And you don’t have to worry about taking a picture together, we can always photoshop you guys in some rural area in Iraq. You just won’t get the free breakfast out of it. I’M KIDDING!

    The article was awesome, thank you for posting the links (Ilegal & Move).

    Honestly, I’ve never seen anything like this, the son for the father thing that the U.S. Dept of Justice has going right now, play out in any federal court in the United States. Never. I don’t know what will happen in the next few months, and how it’s going to affect Mexico or Sinaloa for that matter, but it’s definitely going to change the case law I’m going to depend on in the future.

    And for the first time, I’m actually going to follow the case from the begining and not when it’s over, when it’s too late to do anything about it. Having to wait for a trial to take place is torture and even worse than that is having to wait for a verdict, once your trial is over. I really don’t think this will be a quick trial and it won’t be over any time soon. At least not with his father giving interviews and shit.

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  77. http://lapolaka.com/2010/04/05/acaso-el-maton-del-consulado/
    who was this vato?

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  78. D-Rift, good thing I didn’t get to that Duke bet in time, whew!!!!!

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  79. Damn good game!!!

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  80. I am not buying this one guys. What in the hell would Mayo be flashing his face to the world for? Why would he be saying he is afraid to go to jail? Why would he be saying that he hopes he has the balls to kill himself when he gets caught? And why is he saying that the Mexican Military almost caught him 4 times? Come on. Always remember nothing is on the up and up and there is never a level playing fields.

    The picture looked like him however, it looked like he should have looked 15 years ago. Almost as if it were a cousin that might have a terminal illness and his family will get paid well for his sacrifice. It makes me remember Amado and how many did not think it was him. Hell, Beltron Leyva laying dead did not look like any photo I saw of him. Mayo had a black mustache, srong build and good posture in the picture but go back and look at others and that was not the case.

    A nickle dime thief doesn’t even admit they are afraid to go to jail. Much less the kingpin of an organization that thrives on creating fear in any and everyone. But this powerfull gangster is afraid to go to jail. Hell, he stands a great chance of buying his way out of any jail in Mexico and maybe some in the US.

    He hopes he has the balls to kill himself when he is caught. It makes me expect some kind of Navy Sills bullshit shootout that leaves his cousin that is dying with cancer dead and the Mexican Government will claim victory “Mayo is dead” and all will believe and cheer.

    And the Mexican Army has almost caught him 4 times. Wow, the same Mexican Army lead by Calderon that has been accused of going after every catel but the Sinaloa. Wait, it was my understanding that they were Mayo and Chapo’s right hand. If the intend was to divert heat about this, it is too elementary.

    I get the feel that something signifcant occurred and someone decided they want to retire without any trail or heat. I have never bought that Mayo was running around the mountains and jungles with the farmers and smugglers. I always felt that he was in Europe, the US or South America. For that matter Chapo too.

    Why has he not had reconstructive surgeries so that he would never be recognized? He shows a recent photo at 62? Come on. Hell, as much money as he has, he could have had enough surgery to be the aunt in the court room with his son right now. I would believe that before believing he is hiding in the jungle. LOL.

    This interview is part is his smoke screen to walk away. It may be a staged death, or an arrest of someone that they say is him. Hell, he could even continue to play like he is hiding in the jungle and have silly little songs written about him fighting the war.

    Whatever it is, something isn’t right.

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  81. T_R_C: Great. Now I don’t know what to make of this. At first look, all I can make of the interview itself is El Mayo’s state of mind (a sense of remorse and desperation due to his son’s current situation) and perhaps how this interview is going to affect his son’s federal trial (it’s all over the press, even the LA Times has a piece on it).

    But after reading your comment, I’m even more confused now. I understand why you guys are baffled… Where I understood the words alone, you guys understand his true nature.

    Do you think the dying cousin you mentioned would take one for the team and turn himself in so as to save Zambada-Niebla’s federal trial? Do you think El Mayo is willing to do a disappearing act and leave his son behind?

    After all El Mayo is truly the only person that would be able to clarify what position (if any) his son had in his organization. If I were a juror I would believe his father, who actually runs the organization, as opposed to a bunch of rats in Chicago, who reported to God knows who.

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  82. No seas pendejo.

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  83. @ T_R_C

    Some of you guys simply give these guys way too much credit! Deep down inside, they’re all measely thugs!! Look at El Teo, El Muletas, and La Perra, all 3 from Tijuana…these dudes were having countless people dissolved in acid…fookING ACID!! PEOPLE GETTING DISSOLVED IN ACID!! BEHEADINGS!! CHOPPING fookING PEOPLE’S HEADS OFF!! And what happens when all 3 of these fookers get caught!? NOTHING!!! NOT A SINGLE SHOT FIRED!! NOTHING!!

    Sure, Sinaloa is deemed the most powerful cartel in Mexico, but individually, what are these guys truly capable of!?

    A powerful drug cartel is simply a local street gang who managed to make it big! And like most of these street gang chumps who walk around intimidating people when they’re in a big group, alone they are NOTHING!!

    Quit giving these fookers so much credit!! They’re human!! Yes, they fascinate us for obvious reasons…they’ve got loot, bitches, their own songs, and are newspaper headlines…but corner one of these fookers alone and guess what? You’ll more than likely kick his ass as if he were your li’l brother!!

    QUIT GIVING THEM THAT MUCH fookING CREDIT, YOU fookING NARCO NUTHUGGERS!!

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  84. AT LA PURANETA CAPABLE OF LEVANTANDOTE Y PEGARTE UNA PUTISA GUEY
    THATS WHAT THEY R CAPABLE OFF LOSER

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  85. @ T R C

    I agree

    @ LaPuraNeta!

    You have absolutley no idea, if it was easy….. we would all have millions… now wouldn’t we? Think be fore you speak please.

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  86. @ LaPuraNeta…With El Tio, El Muletas and La Perra, you certainly have a point. I agree that they are pretty common and easily replaced.
    What I am taliking about is Mayo has what, a 40 year history in the business. He is literally supported by the Mexican Army too. He has participated in cartels with the best all his life. He has 40 fold the history and experience the guys you compared have. He has a lot of pull. These guys at the top handle huge money, huge investment, and huge payroll. The guys you mentioned have done none of this. In fact they just killed someone rather than pay them. That is kind of like comparing The Rolling Stones to a local band that plays in the bars on the weekend.
    I do not think bringing out a point that Mayo sounded pretty weak saying he is scared of going to jail, and hoping he could pull the trigger on himself if he is caught makes me a what was it, narco nuthugger. I like the comment a lot and it applies to some. You do not know me well sir but I assure you it does not apply to me.
    I wanted to point out that there was more to this interview than what was said in the interview. I participate on this site because i hate what has happened to Mexico, and I feel for the common Mexican. In no way do I intend to sensationalize cartel criminality.

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  87. T_R_C: I like the Stones assessment, nicely done! And I don’t have to mention it, but well said. I get your point, there is more to this interview than words alone, there’s clearly an agenda. What that agenda is, I doubt we’ll find out until it’s in the news and in print.

    LaPuraNeta!: I have to agree, the term does not apply to T_R_C. Are you up for the next round? I highly doubt it.

    Nadien: I agree.

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  88. I agree with La Pura Neta! Ya’ll glorify these cartel druglords as if they are model citizens. These people have ZERO value for human life. They cut off people’s heads, put people in barrels of diesel & acid, burn people alive, bury people alive, kill INNOCENT women & children, the list goes on. The Mexican drug cartels are the most ruthless people on this planet, and they are wrecking havoc in the US as well. Less than 2 hours from my home, 5 members of a Mexican drug cartel were tortured & murdered in a small Alabama town by cartel hitmen for failing to deliver about $500K on time. Right here in the US! And the Federal Government did nothing to help local law enforcement.

    http://www.rightsidenews.com/200808241800/homeland-security/mexican-drug-cartel-terror-reaches-alabama.html

    Some of act as if El Chapo Guzman is a great idol. None of those bastards deserve anything but death for what they’ve done to Mexico, it’s people, & the United States.

    The United States government, which doesn’t want to do anything about because they are just as corrupt as the Mexican government, OWES it the REAL citizens of the United States, & the Mexican citizens to send troops to Mexican & dismantle these organizations once & for all. Put the fear into Mexican criminals that “if you start a cartel, you will do down!’ It started in Columbia, it reached Mexico, it’s only a matter of time before it reaches the United States.

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  89. i think el mayo is preparing the road for something.

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  90. this reminds me of something that happened in Sonora sometime ago….CULIACÁN.- Ejemplares de la revista Proceso de esta semana, que incluyen una publicación sobre una investigación que el Cisen realiza al ex Alcalde de Culiacán y actual precandidato a la Gubernatura de Sinaloa por el PRI, Jesús Vizcarra Calderón, por presuntos nexos con el narcotráfico, “desaparecieron” de los puestos de revista y tiendas departamentales en Culiacán y Mazatlán.

    Voceadores entrevistados aseguraron que el semanario no llegaría al puerto. Incluso, en una tienda departamental comentaron que el proveedor de la revista había surtido ayer y que ya no lo volvería a hacer hasta la próxima semana.

    La gerente de Ventas y Mercadotecnia de Proceso, Margarita Carreón, explicó que el semanario se distribuyó normalmente; incluso, el número de ejemplares se multiplicó para Sinaloa, debido al interés que podría suscitar el tema de su portada, que es el encuentro entre el periodista Julio Scherer e Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada.

    Por ejemplo, voceadores de Culiacán reciben unos 200 ejemplares; esta vez entregaron 400. En Mazatlán se distribuye un número similar.

    Personal de la revista editada en la Ciudad de México recibió información de que una pareja compró 150 ejemplares en Culiacán, mientras otros 250 se alcanzaron a distribuir.

    La edición de Proceso indica que Vizcarra se dedicaba a la compra y venta de ganado como una de sus primeras actividades para “blanquear los cuantiosos recursos” ilegales de José Inés Calderón Quintero, quien “entre 1976 y 1988 se convirtió en uno de los narcotraficantes más fuertes de Sinaloa y del País”.

    ‘Jamás’: Vizcarra

    “Jamás Vizcarra ha hecho nada malo”, respondió el precandidato del PRI a Gobernador de Sinaloa sobre el reportaje publicado por la revista Proceso en el que se le vincula con Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada.

    Jesús Vizcarra Calderón dijo que esperará al día de hoy para decidir si manda una carta aclaratoria al semanario.

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  91. @YEYO

    compa

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  92. @YEYO

    compa los zambadines own a produce company that operates in chicago, l.a & phoenix…. as a matter of fact one of their produce warehouse is very near the fbi bldg in chicago…. they also own vaquero clothing stores, used car dealers and pizza places… at least es lo ke me dijo un compa del compa ke trabaja con un compa ke le dijo esto… LOL…. les apuesto ke esa tia esta casada con un guzman…. me lo conto un sopilote ke es compa de un mentado pajarito…

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  93. @ilegal

    compa la lecheria has already been blacklisted by the us treasury…. google zambadas garcia financial network… sus hijas y esposa y nuera are all on there too along with other negocios in mexico…

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  94. @ D_Nephew

    LMAO!!! estos pinchi’s pajaritos anonimos!

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  95. @ Dnephew
    I fooken knew it !!!! I think the company is called El Gallito imports and is run by La Bodega inc out of Chicago they distribute everything that is Mexican desde tortillas asta chiles en bote they operate out of Franklin Park and they ahve a huge warehouse in the southside of Chicago as well Pato knows exactly what I am talking about it is on Western ave and I-55 you can see it right of the highway,The one in FP is like less than a mile away from the Ohare airport no bullshit they are right across the street.Dont take my word on this but it is likley because there was a wahrehouse bust in Franklin Park not to long ago that yielded a shit load of weed the company was a fruit distribuiter right behind the Villa Allegre Housing Projects aka La Selva and employs nothing but Mexicans I forget the name of it.Now this might be another group and I could be wrong but I always suspected something..No me dijo un compa nomas wache you como andaba el pedo..Those dudes got mad pull with the local goverments in the area the are big tax revenue to the city and make alot of donations to political parties.Pero might be all talk and theorys in my own mind.Car dealers ay un chingo de raza Mexicana pos who knows some of them might be their too/

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  96. What I stated above could all be bullshit it definatley aint a fact thats for sure..These people have been in buisness for over 2 decades and have some of the best Mexican products in the Midwest markets and all over the world..I love their tostedas and queso…lol

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  97. @isabella

    the new york reference might be related to some indictments out of brooklyn that relates to zambada associates….

    research esteban rodriguez olivera & tirso martinez sanchez….

    if you got any questions feel free to ask…. n i’ll hook u up con mi contacto el mentado pajarito…. LOL….

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  98. @YEYO…..

    eres todo un anderson cooper wey…. buen reporte…. LOL…..

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  99. Mike whats up with a post on the Zambada interview… I want to see what you guys think about it. For me it seems that the Man is tired of all of this and wants out. Put it up and I will break it down for you.

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  100. “Me pueden agarrar en cualquier momento… o nunca”
    Sounds to me like he’s saying the gov’t. could change alliances at any time or could continue to back him.

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  101. 99….

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  102. BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA, suck it Bitches!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  103. I gave you that one Hanna…lol.

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  104. I think theres is a par 2 to this interview or at least I hpoe there is he left us in suspense Mayo stated that he talks to Chapo on the phone all the time then the convo ended with Mayo asking if he wanted to talk to Chapo..Maybe he got ahold of him..that would be sweet as hell..
    @Dnephew
    Puro cotorreo that shit if far fetched and I am sure the US gov keeps tabs on Mayos familiy here in the the US.

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  105. Okay this is how I see the Zambada Interview. My father and uncles knew him personaly along time ago we are talking decades. They grew up with similar backgrounds. I can speak of this now because they are all gone, some naturally, others not.

    These are simple people from a simple time. They grew up with nothing and made something. When I look at the interview I look at the clothes. He looks modest and humble like most of the people from the Sierra de Durando and Sinaloa. The kind of people that say hello with a firm handshake and hug and invite you in to eat even if they barely have enough to feed themselves. These people value the little things in life like rain for the crops to grow, having large families, a car that doesnt break down and a 38 super that doesnt jamm. They are very respectful always refer to people as “usted”

    When I read the interview and looked at the pictures I saw flashes of my father and my uncles. The man has taken some huge hits recently. I think he grows tired of the constant fighting and doesnt see an end to it. One indication of this was when Mazatlan became a battle ground he pulled back and turned it over to Chapo so that he could do the fighting.

    He refused to talk about Vicente obiously it pains him deeply and he probably blames himself for his capture and extradition.

    So the questions are Why do the interview, What is to gain?
    Why mention that you talk to Chapo on the phone?
    State that his replacement is already out their?
    Say that he is terrified of being captured and mention that he has gotten away 4 times?

    The only reason to do an interview is to try and get some mesage out. So what was it? He mentioned that he did not try to Kill Calderon and that something like that would never cross his mind. The only thing that he could gain from this is some good publicity. But did he get it? Doesnt seem like it.

    Why mention that he talks to chapo on the phone all the time. Most people believe that someone like that never touches a cell phone and that a conversation between him and chapo would be relayed between 3 or 4 people. The fact that he told the reporter that he would try to get him an interview with chapo and got on the phone, then ended their interview, was to me a bait and switch. I think that Mayo wasnt getting what he wanted from the interview stopped under some pretence then ended it.

    One thing that was clear to me was his physical condition for a 60 year old man. These people dont eat additives or preservatives everthying organic. They are constantly hiking in the mountains. My grandpa that lived his whole life in la sierra de sinaloa, at 75 was faster up mountains than people in their 20′s. When Mayo mentioned that he got away 4 times and that he doesnt go into the cities for parties basically says to the government that unless its a surprise 3 in the morning kick in the door raid he isnt getting caught. Remember that Arturo Beltran got cornered in a condo complex. Once Mayo gets a wiff of some steep terrain with dense trees you wont catch him. Those 20 year old soldiers carrying all that heavy equipment cant keep up with him.

    I think these people have been propt up by constant news reports and the narco corridos that we believe them to be greek gods. Well obviously they are not. Mayo has more cash than he could ever use especially living the life in the mexican wilderness.

    I asked someone once, why if you have all this money why dont you get out of the game? The response from him was “look at all the mouths I have to feed.” He was refering to the people that work for him and they had not yet amased their fortunes and needed the game to make ends meet. I am not appoligizing for him but the truth be told. I am sure that when he got into the business he wasnt on a killing rampage. He just wanted to make a better life for himself and his family, but its a slipery slop.

    The fact that Vicente is in The US facing charges and Mayo sticks his head out is because he may want to work a deal for his son. His son really didnt have a choice in this life Mayo did. If mayo feals responsible he may want to switch places work a deal so that vicente gets a light sentence. As much of a butcher as we make him out to be he is still a father with very high regard to his family and the oldest boy to a sinaloa family is huge………..

    Osiel got 25 that would put mayo at 80 when he gets out that would be lights out for the Capo.

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  106. Isabella,

    I understand you, I feel your pain. I have had the same problems, I’ve been on bothe ends. I am happy that I opened my eyes and finally I left all that behind me.
    Best wishes

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  107. Enamorado: I hope my nephew, for my sister’s sake, does the same. I think my mom put too much fear into my little soul when I was growing up, so I didn’t do any experimenting (ever), it just wasn’t my thing. For the record my mom supports corporal punishment and with good reason too, I was a stubborn child and I did my share of back talking (I like to think I was argumentative).

    Now as an adult, I think I’m a little bit of a control freak + I can’t even handle a glass of wine, so it’s definitely not going to happen ever. Kids in my class, more than half, are taking adderall and other barbiturates to get by, I don’t think they realize that the more they take it the more dependant they become. I’d rather stick to antioxidants and meditation + I need it, my boss is the devil in a ill-fitted suit and he smells like farts all the time. On the other hand, my sister’s boss smokes weed and he’s one of the best tax attorneys in the nation (he always comes out in http://www.superlawyers.com). At the end of the day… To each his own.

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  108. “The fact that Vicente is in The US facing charges and Mayo sticks his head out is because he may want to work a deal for his son. His son really didnt have a choice in this life Mayo did. If mayo feals responsible he may want to switch places work a deal so that vicente gets a light sentence. As much of a butcher as we make him out to be he is still a father with very high regard to his family and the oldest boy to a sinaloa family is huge………..”

    Tu Padre: I understand you guys have a lot of questions. As someone who is not familiar with the Mexican cartels, I only understood his words, but I don’t understand his nature. You guys have a damn good handle on that.

    I agree with you, he probably is dealing with a lot of remorse, because it’s his first son and he’s still very young. Everyone enjoys sitting in their high horses judging left and right (personally, hate that quality in people, it makes them less human to me), but like you said Vicente didn’t have a choice as to who his father would be in this life. I really doubt he would have been like, “Yeah, I pick the drug lord from Sinaloa, that’s who I want my father to be.” And even then, he probably loves and respects his father. I said, weeks ago, that his Jesus Vicente Zambada-Niebla is simply bate and that the U.S. government wants El Mayo Zambada and El Chapo Guzman.

    Everyone else: I’ve never seen anything play out like this, but whatever happens it’s going to change everything. And we still don’t know if it’s for better or worse, can you guys imagine a Beltran-Leyva as the head of the Sinaloa cartel? At this point would we be able to pick the better of two evils? I guess, we’ll find out in due time.

    And for the record, they are not greek gods, in fact, they are all very susceptible to death. Most of these guys die in their 40s and that’s only if luck is infatuated with them.

    Judge Castillo will have no other choice but to throw the book at him or them. I’m talking about 100 or even 200 years, based on the amount of cocaine the indictment alleges. I think it’s stupid, because Vicente will only last, at most, 50 or 60 years, and if El Mayo turns himself in, he’s only going to last 20 years. So why would you convict anyone to 100 years a la Bernie Madoff if they have already lived an entire lifetime (at least El Chapo and El Mayo have).

    Stop doing drugs and that will put a dent in the drug economy – that’s the only solution. By the way, what El Mayo said about the government doing “too little too late,” was a slap on the face and I’m not sure if it was meant for the U.S. government or the Mexican government, but I’d like to think it was meant for both.

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  109. collateralmurder.com

    tragic……………

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  110. I was watching el capo right now and that fooken guy said the same shit as el mayo. I know I aint the only one in here that watches that shit

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  111. I had to look that up, but that looks like a good show.

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  112. thats not zambada its a stand in – a stunt double
    next thing he will be hosting a narco talk show or perhaps a
    cooking with zambada – sicario style tacos de cabeza

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  113. it looks like i’m not the only one who thinks that’s not el mayo, i’m not saying the interview never happened, but that picture, tiene un no se que, que que se yo…

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  114. 08sil, you should check out “el ventilador” , that’s a nice show, kind of like el capo, but it has more action, levantones, street scenes, agarres y perico. it’s in LATV, channel 57. it’s new and also filmed in Colombia.

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  115. zambada no es moreno es espanol- old school spanish stock
    aristocrat- that stuff about hiding in the bushes lol – sure pal
    he is on a military base under full protection ( air force ) how else
    do you fly 707s into mexico full of coke – air power-

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  116. That’s Zambada… a little worked (cosmetic surgery)… but it’s him.. Zambada is a mastermind. He created (or rather exposed) his image as a humble, rancher styled character. An image that has nothing to do with your stereotypical mob-boss; flaunting jewelry, fancy clothes cars and mansions. Notice his simple attire. Also notice the background. Dirt and brush. Not a single sign of a lavish lifestyle (not that he doesn’t live it or occasionaly does so). A perfect picture of a simple man, saying how he cries for his son, and dreads the idea of being incarcerated. Something that makes him seem more humanly related with the rest of the population. Also notice how the reporter describes what they ate. That was purposely written, and subconsciously meant to describe him as a “frijolitos over lobster” elector. What will that do? It quells peoples’ fearful distorted image of the Sinaloa Cartel, as opossed to the Zetas (Sinaloa Cartels’ #1 Enemy). The Sinaloa Cartel is respected by the “governments’ true government” to a certain extent, due to it’s more than 40 years in existence (a kind of seniority?) A big plus for the Sinaloa Cartel, is that the Zetas (whom many claim the Mexican Government is really after in Mexicos’ drug war”) were founded by (as we all know) defecting elite Mexican soldiers, which was a direct slap to Mexicos’ Federal Government.

    Call it whatever you want to call it… I cal it “narcopolitical”… ; )

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  117. @ fletcher

    What do you know, you are nothing but a cop or a raton. Only a peace of shit would use that name. This I know for sure. This is the second time I have seen you use that name.

    Just so the rest of you know, Fletcher was the name of the rat who took down some really good friends. The week fooker was looking at 2 years, instead he gave up 40 people to the DEA. Some of those people got seriouse time. He also ratted on Leo and Marcos Paredes. Only scum would use that name. Doubt it really is Fletcher, so I’m sure its probably a cop. Either way, whoever you are, do the rest of us a favor, blow your brains out. Spare the rest of us.

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  118. “zambada no es moreno es espanol”, wow! this guy must be CIA or something bigger, lmao!! i don’t know how many paisanos from Culichi write in this site, but i’m sure they know that we sometimes use the word “mayo” to depict a person who is from la sierra, even when they are not from Sonora, we used to call them “mayos”, and they call Ismael Zambada “mayo” for the same reason, he looks bien indio, like a pinchi mayo de la sierra, of course we later started using the term “buchon” instead of mayo in the late 90′s, and now they call “buchon” anybody who anda de narquillo cagapalos even when they are from the city.

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  119. @ilegal,

    Not to contradict you. But my understanding is that Mayo got his nick name from his first name. Same reason we called Ismael Higuera “Mayel” we call Ismael Z “el Mayo.” Its an evolution of his name.

    Also, with regard to the dark skin just look at Vicente where did he get his complexion? As far as I know the Nieblas from Durango are gueros and he is far from being a guero. I have never seen Mayo in person so I have no clue what he looks like. Never had the balls to ask anyone to describe him for me either.

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  120. Isabella:

    Are you an educator? The reason I ask is that I go to school to be an educator myself.

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  121. Tupadre is right

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  122. Enamorado: No, I’m just a student and hopefully a criminal defense attorney in a couple of years. But teachers are highly important and your job will be more important than mine. That’s definitely one thing I can assure you of :)

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