If You’re a White European, Stay Out of Arizona

May 21st, 2010 | By Michel Marizco | Category: General News, Immigration, Politics
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THE BORDER REPORT

The United States just eliminated the only paperwork proof for white Europeans who find themselves encountered by a cop in Arizona enforcing the new immigration laws.

Ah, desmadre, where would I be without you? This comes from an immigration lawyer here in Tucson, Rachel Wilson.  (Gracias, comadre.)

It creates a spectacular mess for Arizona in its enforcement of SB 2162. The Homeland Security Department eliminated the paper arrival/departure record requirement for foreign nationals entering the country under the visa waiver program.

Millions of foreign nationals from predominantly European countries travel here under the visa waiver program. And they can no longer readily prove it if they are stopped by a cop in Arizona who asks them about their legal status.

The form eliminated was called the I-94W and supplied travelers a paper record of when they arrived in the U.S. and when they’re supposed to leave. That form would have been enough for a cop in Arizona to determine the person is here legally. And it just got dumped.

In its place is the Electronic System for Travel Authorization, a database that travelers are supposed to log in to prior to leaving their country for the U.S. However, it’s a digital file in a federal database. This means that a cop who stops a European traveler will have to then call Homeland Security and ask them to access the database. Meanwhile, the European is sitting there, detained by a cop. It’s possible that local law enforcement agencies will have access to ESTA. I find it unlikely however, because, from the federal point of view, determining legal status is a federal duty, not a job for local cops.

The intent, according to DHS, is to streamline the flow of travelers. But if their intent was also to take a huge economic swipe at the state of Arizona for trying to enforce federal immigration laws, someone in Washington is slapping themselves on the back in congratulations. Arizona cops are right now, being trained in immigration law and under 2162, they’re not supposed to use race or color to build reasonable suspicion to ask someone about their status. What the U.S. government just did was make white Europeans as undocumented as illegal migrants. How will Arizona law enforcement look in the eyes of the courts and the public if they ignore white Europeans? Not good. Not good at all. Downright selective in fact.

Holy hell, I love watching a train wreck. And the U.S. just put a penny on the Arizona rail.

Here’s the list of countries:

Andorra, Hungary, New Zealand, Australia, Iceland, Norway,  Austria, Ireland, Portugal, Belgium, Italy,   San Marino Brunei  Japan   Singapore Czech Republic  Latvia  Slovakia Denmark, Liechtenstein, Slovenia, Estonia, Lithuania, South Korea Finland, Luxembourg, Spain France  Malta   Sweden Germany, Monaco  Switzerland, Greece,  the Netherlands, United Kingdom

29 comments
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  1. This might actually be a really good thing if you’re against SB 2162. Think of the tour-buses full of people from all those countries up here going to the Grand Canyon, and the part of the law that says they can get sued if the don’t enforce it.

    “Look! Look at that Mr. Officer, a whole bus of people without proof!”

    Cops are going to hate this……

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    Tucsonian Reply:

    Yep, cause federal law doesn’t require all tourists to carry their passports every where they go. Also, the dumb ass cops would never be smart enough to put a list of visa waiver countries all together on a sheet of paper and see if the passport holder is from that country. Keep congratulating yourself DC idiots. We’re not that stupid here in AZ.

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  3. A penny and a cow, or so it seems.

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  4. Lets waste some more time and money and man hours for police who DIDNT pass this bill, or even VOTE for this bill, lets punish them for what Brewer did so they can waste more time with pulling people over and less time capturing rapists and murderers and protecting the general public. Way to go America. I feel safe. Better yet, all the people who are here illegally- go start the paperwork for being a citizen. My forefathers had to do it, I dont understand why you dont. I am all for you making a better life for you and your families and living in a 3rd world country must be horrible, but seriously do it right. I follow the law- why should you be any different.

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  5. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by arizonaBNN, Mark Robertson. Mark Robertson said: If You’re a White European, Stay Out of Arizona http://tinyurl.com/27j8s44 […]

  6. Have you guys seen this>

    U.S. Consulate Nogales released the following Warden Message on May
    19, 2010:
    This Warden Message is to inform U.S. citizens traveling to and
    residing in Mexico of security concerns for travelers driving on
    Highway 8 between the U.S./Mexico border and Puerto Peñasco (Rocky
    Point). There have been reports that unauthorized checkpoints have
    been set up by unknown persons at night. Reports from those passing
    through these checkpoints indicate that the operators of the
    checkpoint only requested identification before allowing vehicles to
    pass. U.S. Consulate Nogales strongly advises any traveler who must
    take this route to do so during daylight hours.
    The Consulate’s Security office has advised Consulate personnel to
    limit travel to major roads during daylight hours. Further,
    Consulate staff on official travel between cities must use armored
    vehicles. U.S. government employees are also instructed to follow
    the security practices detailed in “A Safe Trip Abroad,” which can be
    found at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/safety/safety_1747.html.
    If you are stopped at an unofficial checkpoint:
    1. Do not resist. Cooperate immediately and fully.
    2. Stay calm, put up your hands, and comply with demands.
    3. If you have a child in the car, immediately alert the checkpoint
    operators of the child’s presence.
    At some checkpoints, motorists who have not stopped at the unofficial
    checkpoints have been shot at and killed.
    If you are a victim, be sure to notify the U.S. Consulate in Nogales
    (+52-631-313-8150, or +52-631-318-0723 after hours) and consider
    contacting local police at 066.
    U.S. citizens traveling through northern Mexico should exercise
    caution. Review of recent violence indicates that although criminal
    acts can occur unexpectedly at any time of day, overall it is safer
    to travel during the morning and early afternoon hours. American
    citizens are advised to refer to guidance in the Department of
    State’s most recent Travel Warning for Mexico located on the internet
    at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_4755.html and
    Country Specific Information for Mexico, which can be found at
    http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html for
    additional information regarding the current security situation in
    the country. U.S. citizens living or traveling abroad are encouraged
    to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate through the
    State Department’s travel registration website
    https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui/.
    For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please contact
    the U.S. Embassy or the closest U.S. Consulate.
    U.S. citizens in Nogales’ consular district may contact the American
    Citizens Services (ACS) Unit at the U.S. Consulate, located on Calle
    San Jose (S/N), Col. Los Alamos, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico; telephone
    011 +52 (631) 311-8150; after hours emergency telephone 011 +52 1
    (631) 318-0723; web page: http://nogales.usconsulate.gov/; ACS Unit
    fax 011 +52 (631) 313-4652; email: NogalesACS@state.gov

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  7. Lol! They finally busted the rodent. The rabbit got what he had coming. Goodbye, rodent.

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    johnny Reply:

    who did they bust

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    bill f Reply:

    The rodent is toast! JaJaJa!

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    johnny Reply:

    who u talkin about rabbit on borderreporter

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    Danny Reply:

    C is in hot water. as soon as dust settles border reporter will be the first to know.

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    Curious Reply:

    damn that sucks.

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    johnny Reply:

    WHATS UP WITH C

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  8. Think about a European who isn’t white. Now he/she could find him/herself under suspicion of falsifying a foreign passport. It could be hours or longer before it’s cleared up, which translates into resources expended for nothing and more cops off the street and on the phone instead of chasing mass murderers and kiddy diddlers, not to mention all those drug peddlers.

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  9. Good thing my French husband isn’t coming back with me to visit my family in Arizona.

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  10. good thing my extremely hot and young Norwegian bride who was about to come to the States and marry me is just part of my fantasies and twisted imagination, otherwise i would be worried and sick and posting some weird comments about it on the Border Reporter.

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  11. It would have been so much easier with a mine field in different languages.There not prejudice,don’t care who steps on them.Couldn’t blame the U.S. for drug use,the haulers would all go poof ,no 7000 stolen cars a year in the Ironwoods.The list is endless

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  12. my story above about the road block turned out to be tea party bullshit…sorry

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    ilegal Reply:

    yeah, it was made up from an article and comments written in this site when Michael was warning people about illegal check points in the Sonoran desert and he asked the readers for tips about what could they do if they find themselves pulled over at one of those check points while travelling through Sonora.

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    Rex Reply:

    I’ve driven a Big-Truck (Semi) in the U.S. for nearly thirty years, but years ago when things would slow down in the Winter a bunch of buddies and I would pack up our bicycles and cruise around Mexico where it was cheap and warm.

    While it was great fun to ask little old ladies and children how far it was to the next town (One hour by car, two hours by bicycle!), the Truck-Drivers were by far the most reliable sources of information. Especially if we wanted to know the booze laws in the next town. Mexico has a myriad of booze laws, (like The South), and riding your bike all day and then finding you got there to early or late would really bum out your whole day.

    Dang, off topic again! What I wanted to say was that each time traveling in Mexico I always liked to at least once grab a ride in a Mexican Truck. Sometimes it was just to the top of the hill when I would then come back to the group going a different way, sometimes it was just that I needed a couple of days away.

    But riding in a Mexican Truck at night is truly insane, and those guys are the best Drivers in the world in my opinion. We came to one of those check-points late at night and I had probably fifteen beers (several empty cans at my feet), and I asked the Driver,

    “Oh Shucks, What are they looking for? Booze? Drugs? Guns? (which we both had all three).

    As he blazed through the check-point he said to me, “Solo Feria”

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  13. Gabriella Speaks City Council Meeting April 27, 2010

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShkpO9Rf1bo

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  14. It looks like they are saying they dont have Nacho Coronel…

    http://sdpnoticias.com/sdp/contenido/nacional/2010/05/20/1003/1047837

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    ilegal Reply:

    o sea que ya va a aparecer por ahi el jefe Diego, lol!

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  15. Damn is it November yet? This amateur in the casa blance, ka-bron como cansa! Chairman Baraca, ya me aguito! Change is coming….pronto por favor.

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  16. Why can’t the police just call their dispatch, which they normally do to request info (driver’s license, registration, etc) and give them the passport info. Then the police dispatch can call CBP dispatch to get the electronic info. 2 minutes to 5 minutes tops??? I don’t see the big deal.

    It’s only taken about 9 years to correct the problem from 9/11/2001. Remember some of the terrorists were student visa overstays (making them illegal aliens), but there was no system in place to track when people using these visas actually left the country.

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  17. […] If You're A White European, Stay Out Of Arizona – Border Reporter … Submitted on:Wednesday 26th of May 2010 03:50:56 AM voted by 10 users […]

  18. Michel, you probably knew this already about Russell Pearce, but this is news to me:

    “One of the more emotional moments of the evening came when Maricopa County Sheriff’s Deputy Sean Pearce spoke. Pearce, the son of immigration-bill sponsor Sen. Russell Pearce, R-Mesa, was shot by an undocumented immigrant in December 2004 while serving a search warrant at a Mesa home. The shooting was one of the events that drove the senator’s effort.

    “As my dad says, it (Senate Bill 1070) takes the handcuffs off the police and puts them on the right people,” Pearce said.”
    Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/community/tempe/articles/2010/05/30/20100530airzona-immigration-law-supporters.html#ixzz0pTf3RDJN

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  19. Who cares? The Euros are all cheap…throw them the hell out with the Mexicans. None of them belong there. I lived in AZ for 15 yrs. And I just got back from a visit there. There are too many damn people there now. The less people in Arizona, the better off they will be.

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